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Discussion Starter #101
I missed that one, but it would still show some major marks if the chain hit it.

And a big +1 for J-B Weld. I have seen dirt bikes with radiator fill neck broken clean off, then J-B Welded back on and zero problems. I suspect a radiator fill neck will see a lot higher pressures that the case would ever see. Plus J-B Weld has been the go to fix for dirt bike case cracks, punctures and major holes for years. You will find lots of Adventure Riders carry J-B Weld (or similar) as part of their tool kits.
Exactly. That part was very clean and smooth except for that weird vice-grip mark on the bottom- only they know what they were doing...

As for JB Weld, it always lives in my tool kit too- never had to do major repairs with it though. Guess if all does not go well, that's the first thing I am going to try.

Thanks all. Tomorrow is end of week for Yamaha so I am hoping I get a call back so I know how to proceed...
 

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Not sure if this has been asked or answered, but is the hole above or below the oil line, including when the bike is on the side stand? I would assume it must be a few inches above it.
 

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Discussion Starter #104
Not sure if this has been asked or answered, but is the hole above or below the oil line, including when the bike is on the side stand? I would assume it must be a few inches above it.
Seems like a bit of oil did spill but I'm not sure if it is above out below the line... thoughts? Haven't been able to check oil level since either...
 

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Thanks for all the support guys. Just a quick update, I did contact Yamaha customer service who said they would talk to the Yamaha tech who rejected the claim and get back to me. That was Wednesday. She didn't call me back on Thursday as she said she would. I called her today and got her colleague and told him to ask her to call me back. She didnt. So, now have to wait till Monday- I will try to get a different rep to help me as this one seems way too slow. I did point out that the tech did not even inspect the bike physically and made that assumption.

Even though I have paperwork to prove all necessary maintenance has been done on time, it's irrelevant to this case because there is no mention of taking out bolts and putting anti-seize on them. I have treated whatever bolt I have taken out (for example, the right side had a lot of corrosion and ACF50 worked great for surface corrosion) but there are hundreds of bolts on this bike! Hopefully Yamaha will now be more willing to help since they don't have to warrant my claim but help me get the shop to 'fess up and fix their mistake.

I sure hope that Yamaha decides to send a tech to check the bike himself and test out this theory of chain slap and examine all the evidence. Till then the shop is keeping the bike- not at my cost though but I think I need to go in and dig some more. It's a shame for this shop as I found them one of the better ones in the city and willing to travel about 15+ miles to this place for service- but like I said, I am pretty sure the tech was scared of some action from his bosses and the supervisor wants to help him out. But this is no way to treat a customer and I am going to fight it till I get justice. Yamaha being slow is not helping...anyone have any direct contacts at Yamaha or a email address? Their customer service really needs a makeover- I can get NYC govt officials (even the DMV) to work faster!
Hey Motorock, which shop is this in nyc? I'd like to avoid.

Sent from my SM-G900T using Tapatalk
 

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There are some people that can weld aluminum cans together...thus I don't see why this couldn't be fixed by a talented person, including putting the old threaded part back on.

In reference to J-B weld, I'm not sure if that would hold up in terms of maintaining the original support post. It goes out quite far, and I would think vibration would force it to fail. And if it does fail, then you have an instant oil leak which could be significant, and it will fail when you're riding the bike. If you don't need the support post, then "plugging" the hole would be acceptable, but I'm not sure J-B weld would be the best product for such a wide-open hole. In terms of "pressure" that crankcase has breather hoses, so pressure should be zero.

The shop should carefully clean the engine case (without getting cleaning product into the engine) and the part, and remove the seized bolt. If going the weld route, probably best for the front sprocket and chain to be removed and out of the way.

 

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Had a chain snap on a '68 XLCH under warranty. Broke off a chunk of the case but didn't puncture into the engine. The dealer welded it up while still in the frame. No problems until it was stolen. Good riddance.
 

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Who be dissin' da JB Weld repair? Cast aluminum has multiple inclusions and impurities making for a less than ideal candidate for welding. There are many instances in manufacturing where bonding is used for joining materials as opposed to welding.
 

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The J-B weld might work, but I would cut off most of the post and no longer use it as a support item. Otherwise I think there is too much of a chance for failure, and in this situation the failure could result in either a wreck or ruined engine....and it may be too much of a risk even under the best circumstances. If the hole was much higher up on the case it might be a different story. There is a hole in the engine side cover on the other side, and it simply has a threaded plastic cap as the solution (Oil cap), so you are correct, there are other methods.
 

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i just checked
the boss doesn't really stick out that far, its a stiff design thats not really made to hold weight...it's designed to hold on a plastic cover
 

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Discussion Starter #111
Yeah, if I do go the JB Weld route, I am not going to use it to hold the plastic cover either and just plug the hole and use one of the open sprocket covers that were shown earlier. Maybe I use the broken end of that boss, saw out the part that sticks out and patch the broken end onto the crankcase with JB? All it has to do is just stay there (and not support anything) and if there really is no pressure behind the walls, it should theoretically stay put? I did read that these crankcases use aluminum with lot of impurities plus welding will definitely require disassembly- something I want to avoid as much as I can, esp if I am doing it at my expense.
 

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My engineer friend said the same as others in this thread. Cast metals are VERY porous so the aluminum would be stained from oil deposits if the break was existing for extended periods.
 

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Yeah, if I do go the JB Weld route, I am not going to use it to hold the plastic cover either and just plug the hole and use one of the open sprocket covers that were shown earlier. Maybe I use the broken end of that boss, saw out the part that sticks out and patch the broken end onto the crankcase with JB?
That sounds like the best course of action, and using the original piece cut down will make it much easier than trying to close the hole with just epoxy. The piece will fit in perfectly and should make for a nice clean repair.

make sure the broken piece is clean, make sure the hole is clean , coat both surfaces with JB and put it together. You will need to fashion some sort of holder to hold it for a few minutes until it starts to set up, then just let it fully cure (24 hours I think) and you should be good to go .
 

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That sounds like the best course of action, and using the original piece cut down will make it much easier than trying to close the hole with just epoxy. The piece will fit in perfectly and should make for a nice clean repair.

make sure the broken piece is clean, make sure the hole is clean , coat both surfaces with JB and put it together. You will need to fashion some sort of holder to hold it for a few minutes until it starts to set up, then just let it fully cure (24 hours I think) and you should be good to go .
If using epoxy,clean means oil free.Use contact cleaner spray to wash away any oil,remove the paint from the surrounding area and warm the area a little so the contact cleaner evaporates.
 

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Discussion Starter #115
Quick update.

Yamaha thought it was still a claim so had Beavis & Butthead look at the pictures and "infer" that "off-roading"and loose chain caused the break, overlooking the other clear evidence. Shop owner was trying to be nice enough but decided to stick with Yamaha's stance. My conversations with Yamaha folks has created suspicion about all these techs, at the shop & HQ, knowing and defending each other...

So right now, I'm waiting for a tow truck to take the bike home where I'm going to prep it for the JB weld fix using the very helpful info from you guys and tons of YouTube videos. Any other advice regarding this is welcome.

Also, going forth, I plan to learn more mechanical skills to avoid giving bikes to shoddy mechanics who cannot be held accountable for the damage they cause. It's amazing how these shops charge so much and yet their mechs know so little!
 

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If you go the JB Weld route, then don't use that as an attachment point...in fact, I would cut off the threaded post. Best of luck for a permanent fix (and get your battery on a charger).
 

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Motorock, I Just saw the right up that was published in the "service" section of Cycle World that has to be you? How did you make out with this situation?
 

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Discussion Starter #119 (Edited)
Ah thanks for pointing it out- I nearly flung that issue away as I had given up on hearing from Cycle world!

Been meaning to update this thread but one thing or the other kept happening.
I had to use roadside assistance to tow the bike back home and using all the useful info on this thread, cleaned up the surface with cleaner, scuffed it and used JB weld to put everything back together. I think I did about 2 or 3 coats, each drying for a day or more.

Then, I got the tools to install the chain- and some anti-seize and waterproof grease for the right parts. Then I installed the sprockets and chain myself- and then replaced the rear brake pads too. I had to charge the battery back to life as well but I feel that battery is probably done by now with all the abuse. I put new oil, started up the bike and rode it a couple of days without issue and then on the third night, the bike got stolen!

Yeah. From right outside the apartment building. Had GPS tracker and with the help of the cops retrieved it but thieves did damage to steering lock, ignition wires and gas tank cover. Bike was in the shop for another 3 weeks till insurance cleared claims etc...its been a tough year for the bike and I have little riding time.. However, since I did the JB weld, I must have done nearly 1000 miles and the "weld" seems to be holding on still with no signs of decay. I am not sure I should reinforce with more coats of JB weld or just let it be....

Thank you everyone who helped with the tips to make a successful patch to fix the damage. What is most annoying is that not only were they incompetent but they tried to hide it so desperately...
 
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