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I like working on motorcycles almost as much as riding them. Always have going back to when I was 12 years old. I hate putting my bikes in the shop and don't have a lot of trust of the people working on them. I do everything on my bikes. As you might guess, I love reading about problems and solutions on bike forums. I've learned a shitload of stuff and gotten great advice and solutions. I've also have been able to help answer a few. After spending time on a forum you start to know who knows their shit based on their hands on experience and you can rely on their experience. I've also noticed that there are more than a few people that comment on almost every technical / mechanical issue that have very little idea what they are talking about and probably think a set of screwdrivers and a adjustable wrench is a set of tools. They never talk about any work they've actually done and they never have an actual solution unless they've seen it in another thread and they mostly just type stuff. It's pretty annoying. Am I the only one that's noticed this?
You're not the only one, science noticed it too. It is called Dunning–Kruger effect Dunning–Kruger effect - Wikipedia

To project it to the subject at hand, it requires almost as much competence to know that you don't have skills for a particular job, as it requires to actually do the job.
 

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My grandfather got his engineering degree from a pretty prestigious school back in the 40's, he actually left school to join the coast guard during WW2 and went back to finish. That knowledge made it all the way down through my father and into me. I've never called a contractor or a handyman, and the only time I've ever been to a mechanic was when I didn't want to buy a specialized tool for GM brake pads, and even then the guy asked if I wanted to do it.

If you understand the concept and how to troubleshoot problems the rest falls into places usually. A little bit of common sense and some brains goes a long way.
A little bit of common sense and some brains goes a long way.
Yes, but sadly a lot of people have neither.
 

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No doubt we are prone to overestimating the value of our advice. But that's not what compels us to keep offering it. What compels us is the desire to be part of the conversation. To be popular, and to feel validated by others. Click "Like" if you agree.
 

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No doubt we are prone to overestimating the value of our advice. But that's not what compels us to keep offering it. What compels us is the desire to be part of the conversation. To be popular, and to feel validated by others. Click "Like" if you agree.
now you've been validated, we all like you just fine.
 

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@ChesterBurnet just made every single one of the people who reply to technical threads doubt themselves and wonder which group they are in. The funny part is that the people in the 'adjustable wrench' group are probably sure that he isn't talking about them - those folks seem to have unlimited confidence.
You're probably right. I installed aftermarket clutch lever last month and then parked the bike for a month because of my knee replacement surgery. Didn't even have enough time to do the brake. Only got an hour to ride the bike before I parked it. When I got back on it I noticed that the quick shifter wasn't working right and cruise control light just blinked and wouldn't work. I put it out on the MT 10 forum (totally boring forum) and got a semi ridiculous answer and then a bunch of people telling me I was wrong when I said I didn't think that was the issue.

Finally last week, I got around to trying to install the new brake lever. Turned out, my local shop misordered and the clutch still fit lever fit. He fessed right up and took back the brake lever. In the meantime I had the clutch lever on for over a month and couldn't return it. I went to my shop manual and see that there's a switch that the clutch lever depresses. I put on my reading glasses and look at it and then compare to stock lever and this one was wrong too but still fit. It just didn't depress the button by a pretty long shot. I sat down with a file and spent 2 hours reshaping it. Fortunately all of the material I took off was hidden so it looks brand new still. I tried it with the stock lever and the quick shifter was working but no cruise control, just a blinking light which signifies that there's a problem. I go out a day later and the blinking stopped. I set the cruise control and it's working. I had pulled out the cruise control fuse the night before and it was good but maybe somehow that reset it. I installed the reshaped aftermarket lever and it's working perfectly. I'm still not sure what happened for it to heal itself but I think it was related to the button that was not getting depressed. Usually there's some educated guesses that are well worth considering. I've solved a lot of issues from those experienced guess or eliminated stuff in order to find the issue. But then there are also the babblers that throw out everything from what kind of gas are you using to tire pressures. Most of the babblers don't even realize that an adjustable wrench won't work on an allen head bolt.... because they've never turned a wrench on a motorcycle in their lives.

I was in a tool store one day and 2 guys came in with an angle grinder with the guard taken off and they were looking for a circular saw blade that would fit on it. The tool store people were almost begging them to stop considering doing this and wouldn't help them. I still get the willies just thinking about if they were able to get that blade on.
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2-3 years ago my neighbor and I went into a store for exactly this reason. He had an angle grinder and need to cut a specifically-shaped hole in the side of his house. The knowledgeable guy that helped us pointed to the right circular saw blade to use but repeatedly warned against using it. My neighbor decided to take the risk and I stayed on hand in case the grinder bounced and cut his face up. It worked, but it was a very tense 5 minutes watching him stand on a ladder with his face 10 inches from that spinning blade.
 

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Discussion Starter · #31 ·
2-3 years ago my neighbor and I went into a store for exactly this reason. He had an angle grinder and need to cut a specifically-shaped hole in the side of his house. The knowledgeable guy that helped us pointed to the right circular saw blade to use but repeatedly warned against using it. My neighbor decided to take the risk and I stayed on hand in case the grinder bounced and cut his face up. It worked, but it was a very tense 5 minutes watching him stand on a ladder with his face 10 inches from that spinning blade.
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I couldn't watch that. An oscillating tool will do almost any weird wood plunge cut you'd want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
Have you noticed how many people post that cranking up the preload will compensate for all suspension issues. If you weigh 300 pounds, just crank up that preload and it's perfect. Not only that, they'll get pissed if you disagree.
 

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That's what you did "back in the day", Suspension had no adjustment other than preload, the front didn't even have that.
Throwing in treacle instead of oil to get some damping was the other big thing.
 

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Good thing they didn’t skip the 16mm, like so many other wrench sets…
 

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And they're handy in case you grabbed a 17mm when you really needed a 16, you quickly just re-calibrate! 🤣
 
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