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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I thought it would be worthwhile to start a shock conversion thread outlining the different options available, the cost, what is involved in the conversion, benefits, what to look out for, and any feeback on compression/rebound/pre-load adjustments. So, with that said, if anyone has a conversion to share this is the place to do it!

This first post will be reserved for my 2006 Kawasaki ZX6RR Conversion.


Shock Option: 2005-2006 Kawasaki ZX6RR
Spring Rate: 10.3 kg/mm [575 lb/in]
Adjustability: Preload, Stepless Rebound Dampening, High-Speed & Low-Speed Compression Dampening

Eye-to-eye Length: 330mm [13"] (Identical to stock)
Upper Mount Width: 30mm [1-3/16"] (Identical to stock)
Upper Mount Hole Diameter: Ø10mm [Ø3/8"] (Identical to stock)

Lower Mount Width: 30mm [1-3/16"] (Identical to stock)
Lower Mount Hole Diameter: Ø10mm [Ø3/8"] (Stock = 12mm)

Cost: $36.00 w/Shipping (Purchased on ebay)​

Un-Mounted Photos







Comparison to Stock Shock



Mounted Photos
Reservoir Position:


Lower Mount 1:


Lower Mount 2:


Reservoir Clearance to Starter:


Reservoir Clearance to Engine (Unmodified):
\

-Continued on next thread-
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 · (Edited)
ZX6RR Shock Conversion Continued:

Installation Notes:

1: As mentioned above, the ZX6RR lower shock mount hole is a smaller diameter than the stock shock (Ø10mm vs. Ø12mm). There are two ways to fix this:

A: Drill the lower mount to match the stock shock. This is relatively simple provided that you have the proper size drill bit; either a Ø12mm Metric or Ø31/64" Imperial. The mount is made of aluminum so the drilling process will be pretty easy (Just be sure to use a steady hand and/or, preferably, a drill press). The only downfall to this option is that you have now made an irreversible modification to your shock. Not a huge deal but it definitely limits your ability to resell should that time ever come.​

B: Replace the lower shock spacer and fastener to match the ZX6RR mount hole. Luckily for us there is a perfect, off the shelf, option for this. I have included the part numbers below. I chose this method as it is completely reversible, relatively inexpensive, and does not require a modification that could potentially weaken the shock mount.

Item #1:
Description: SPACER, REAR (10X17X30)
Suzuki Part Number: 62684-40A10

Item #2
Description: BOLT, LOWER (10X58)
Suzuki Part Number: 09103-10027

Item #3
Description: NUT | MODEL K4/K5/K6
Suzuki Part Number: 08319-31107

Total cost = $10.92 from metricpartsoutlet.com​

2: Drop-in Installation is only true with the appropriate components removed. I removed the tank, tank support, rear hugger, and plastic underseat tray to ease the installation of the shock. It could have likely been installed without doing this (as many others have done with the ZX10 and ZX6R shock) but the space is tight and installation required maneuvering the shock to clear various frame components, wires, swingarm, etc...

3: Battery Ground Wire: The neutral battery cable (Black wire) is grounded to the rear starter mount bolt. In order to make room for the ZX6RR shock reservoir, The fastener tying the cable to the starter needed to be loosened in order to rotate the cable out of the way. Photo to follow

4: Reservoir to engine block clearance: Although there is sufficient space (Approximately 1/16" as shown in the first photo below), I modified the end of the reservoir to increase this distance. I was worried that any rotation of the shock, which (however unlikely) is possible, would allow for the reservoir to contact the casing. I used a series of files to gently remove material from the end of the reservoir. It took maybe 10 minutes to complete and gives me added assurance that I will not have any problem with interference.

*Announcement 4-23-2014:
It has been brought to our attention from a fellow forum member (Thank you Hawkerjet!) that the suggestion above to remove material from the end of the reservoir is not so much "suggestion" as much as "Mandatory". Please take note: If you are installing the ZX6RR shock with the reservoir facing down, you will need to remove some material from the end of the reservoir to provide proper clearance to the engine case. I would also suggest installing a low-profile valve stem cap on the nitrogen fill port. While I do not think that it is a huge problem, it's definitely an added peace of mind that nothing will contact a hard part.


Reservoir Clearance to Engine (Unmodified):
\

Reservoir Clearance to Engine (Modified):
 

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I installed my zx6rr shock today. It's a nice improvement over the zx6 shock I had on the bike. Slightly stiffer spring, more adjustability and I found the ride to be much more smooth with this shock. FYI I'm 200lbs with gear and set the preload so there were two full threads showing above the lock nut. This gave me approx 30mm of sag in the back.

Definitely worth the investment.

Daniel


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I've been searching around for this info, forgive me if I missed it. Does anyone have the OEM shock stroke length? I want to be sure the '04 zx10r shock I have will not bottom out internally.
Thanks in advance!
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
I've been searching around for this info, forgive me if I missed it. Does anyone have the OEM shock stroke length? I want to be sure the '04 zx10r shock I have will not bottom out internally.
Thanks in advance!
Great question and great point!

I do not have the details of the stock shock travel but, looking at the rough dimension lines in the photo above, I would estimate 65mm [2 9/16"].

Of the few of the charts I've seen, the ZX10 has a stroke of 67mm or 69mm. Subtract the difference in shock length and you get about 61mm of effective travel. Seems close.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
ZX6RR Shock Update

Just received my ZX6RR shock back from Traxxion Dynamics (Would have been here Tuesday but the weather wreaked havoc on the delivery schedule). Full Rebuild, Spring Installation, and Dyno test! In speaking with Lee of Traxxion; he stated that the shock function is very comparable to the upper level Penske shocks, although with a smaller range of the "sweet spot".

Selected Spring: Hyperco 600 lb/in (Based on my full gear weight of 205lb)

I will upload the Dyno chart as soon as I have access to a scanner.

Install this weekend, expect some more details afterward.

 

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Just received my ZX6RR shock back from Traxxion Dynamics (Would have been here Tuesday but the weather wreaked havoc on the delivery schedule). Full Rebuild, Spring Installation, and Dyno test! In speaking with Lee of Traxxion; he stated that the shock function is very comparable to the upper level Penske shocks, although with a smaller range of the "sweet spot".

Selected Spring: Hyperco 600 lb/in (Based on my full gear weight of 205lb)

I will upload the Dyno chart as soon as I have access to a scanner.

Install this weekend, expect some more details afterward.


Do you mind if I ask how much just the rebuild is on that shock? Do they offer powder coating?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Do you mind if I ask how much just the rebuild is on that shock? Do they offer powder coating?
I don't mind at all!

Rebuild was $225. This includes all dismantling, reassembly, and replacement of all seals, and wear components. On top of that, they run the shock through the dyno to reveal real life damping characteristics.

Hyperco Spring was $109, selected for my weight (ended up with a 600lb/in spring)

As for powder coating: Yes, they do...just not on the spring. They would/could have had the shock body blasted and powder coated if I wanted but it would begin to throw the cost/value ratio off.

They way I look at this: I have a very well functioning shock, with new internals, sprung for my weight, at a third of the cost of a comparative aftermarket. Not too shabby!
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Things to look out for

I just wanted to highlight a couple areas to look out for interferences if you are doing a shock conversion. The FZ is a very tight package and, as such, has very little in the way of clearance around the clevis area of the shock.

1: Watch for contact of the lower portion of the shock spring and the clevis (also the back section of the motor casing); especially with shocks that are longer than stock. The longer shock reduces the angle between the clevis and the shock body therby reducing the clearance between the clevis and spring. It will likely not show with weight on the rear wheel (Suspension compressed) but could become evident at full extension as you rebound off of a bump.


2: This is another 'Longer shock" area to watch out for: the clearance at the rear of the clevis to the swingarm. The clevis will actually touch if you let the swingarm "droop" without the shock installed. Similar to what would happen with full extension of a longer shock. This may not be a problem but, with the small amount of movement that it takes for contact to happen, I would imagine that the shock would not have to be too much longer to cause problems.
 

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Good call on the length part.

The other part is that the clevis is not as long as my Ohlins / ZX 10 shock.

There may not be enough clearance for a 8 mm move of the hole upward.

 

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I'm exploring the 338mm 2004 zx10r shock as an option and would like to get it as close to 330mm as possible to avoid geometry/clearance issues. Having looked at Mr. Dolan's plugged & drilled mod and compared it to mine, it looks like it may be possible to get it to 332-333mm without running out of room. After measuring several times, 6mm (maaaybe 7) seems to be how much the hole can be moved back while keeping 2.5mm (stock) clearance between the clevis and fz's "rear relay arm".

'04 zx10r clevis.jpg
'04 zx10r clevis outer.jpg
'04 zx10r clevis inner.jpg
 

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Something I saw a while ago. Not for a shock assembly but that was for a steering arm. Machining a step washer like this one (each side of the clevis) would work too.

Get the hole where you want it on a mill and machine 2 end washers... your done. If you need more clearance you can file down the end of the clevis... or while you're on the mill... shave 1/4" from the end and be done with it.

With the right tooling its not a very hard job to do.

Sorry for tge cheesy drawing... I'm sure you get the idea. LOL



Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk
 

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Here's a little guide line from racetech I found. Looking at my numbers with 13-16mm free sag to get the OEM ride height put me on the upper end of the range but still fine. Getting the rear ride height and rider sag number should get you close enough not to worry too much for every day or spirit riding. The ZX-10 shock never been intended to be a track mod shock anyway, the Penskee as been R&D for this purpose with ride height adjustment and everything.


Sag
 

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I'm still wondering if anyone else is considering using the racetech shims to shorten the shock internally. They sell shims in 1mm to 3mm increments, looking at shock rebuilding vids and web info, doesn't look too horribly difficult. Would need maybe 2 tools, fork seal bullet and seal head setting tool for about $50 total to do the work. I have a source to charge the bladder with nitrogen, just need the time and motivation to get after it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
I'm still wondering if anyone else is considering using the racetech shims to shorten the shock internally. They sell shims in 1mm to 3mm increments, looking at shock rebuilding vids and web info, doesn't look too horribly difficult. Would need maybe 2 tools, fork seal bullet and seal head setting tool for about $50 total to do the work. I have a source to charge the bladder with nitrogen, just need the time and motivation to get after it.
Had I not found a ZX6RR shock I would have certainly gone this route. Please be sure to let us know how it goes/if it goes; This could be another great step!
 

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I'm still wondering if anyone else is considering using the racetech shims to shorten the shock internally. They sell shims in 1mm to 3mm increments, looking at shock rebuilding vids and web info, doesn't look too horribly difficult. Would need maybe 2 tools, fork seal bullet and seal head setting tool for about $50 total to do the work. I have a source to charge the bladder with nitrogen, just need the time and motivation to get after it.
Keep in mind that when reducing the shock length with the spacers you are also losing travel as well.

Terry
 

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Something I saw a while ago. Not for a shock assembly but that was for a steering arm. Machining a step washer like this one (each side of the clevis) would work too.

Get the hole where you want it on a mill and machine 2 end washers... your done. If you need more clearance you can file down the end of the clevis... or while you're on the mill... shave 1/4" from the end and be done with it.

With the right tooling its not a very hard job to do.

Sorry for tge cheesy drawing... I'm sure you get the idea. LOL



Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk

works like the concentric chain adjustment on a Honda Hawk GT. clever idea.
 

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Keep in mind that when reducing the shock length with the spacers you are also losing travel as well.

Terry
I am taking that into consideration. From most of the shock charts that I've seen the shocks that are longer than the FZ also have a longer stroke, so it seems that it would be ok to shim and wind up near the same stroke as stock FZ.
 
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