Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner

1 - 15 of 15 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
74 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
My buddy and I have noticed that both our 2015 and 2018 09s have non-freely moving front wheels. The brake pads rub when the wheel is up off the ground and bring the wheel to a stop. I have looked at a few forums but have not found any
answers on solving this issue.

Is this something to worry about? Has anyone solved this?

Thanks!

something very similar to this
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
No fun riding when in the back of your mind you know somethings not right with your front brake pads. If you have doubts do a service. Many a video on this service.
If you need any help post back. I'm a fan of EBC centered pads, Motul DOT 4, lithium grease and I use Oreileys brake cleaner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
268 Posts
No fun riding when in the back of your mind you know somethings not right with your front brake pads. If you have doubts do a service. Many a video on this service.
If you need any help post back. I'm a fan of EBC centered pads, Motul DOT 4, lithium grease and I use Oreileys brake cleaner.
You almost got a Thumbs up, until you said Lithium Grease! Shouldn’t be petroleum grease anywhere near a brake caliper. There’s no slides to lube, if there were a Silicone brake lube that won’t melt is the right product. There is specific DOT grease that is used when rebuilding a caliper as well, for the seals.
 
  • Like
Reactions: LouG and Camp49

·
Registered
Joined
·
400 Posts
You almost got a Thumbs up, until you said Lithium Grease! Shouldn’t be petroleum grease anywhere near a brake caliper. There’s no slides to lube, if there were a Silicone brake lube that won’t melt is the right product. There is specific DOT grease that is used when rebuilding a caliper as well, for the seals.
160326

Good Call CB750. Appreciate the correction.
 

·
Registered
2018 MT09 Street
Joined
·
167 Posts
lube with a thin layer of anti-seize copper brake grease in these area (rod, and back side of the pad). DO NOT LUBE THE SIDE OF THE BRAKE SURFACE THAT CONTACTS WITH THE BRAKE DISC. do this for both front and rear brakes. that might fix your problem. if not try cleaning the whole caliper.


160327


 

·
Registered
2018 MT09 Street
Joined
·
167 Posts
some trackday guys or racers install magnets inside the pistons so that the pad is guaranteed to stick to the piston and not have brake drag when not using the brakes during races. but that over kill for street use
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,840 Posts
A quick fix is to remove the pads one side at a time, pump out the pistons a little until you see the travel marks, clean thoroughly with brake cleaner on a toothbrush (wife's or girlfriends is ideal), then lightly lube with approved brake lube.
 

·
Registered
2016 xsr 900
Joined
·
515 Posts
A quick fix is to remove the pads one side at a time, pump out the pistons a little until you see the travel marks, clean thoroughly with brake cleaner on a toothbrush (wife's or girlfriends is ideal), then lightly lube with approved brake lube.
Is a teenage child's toothbrush also acceptable? I'd prefer it over the wife's brush but I want to make sure I get my calipers nice and clean - don't want the wrong tool for the job.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
10 Posts
I like to pump the lever and extend the pistons out, I then use a shoelace with brake fluid on it to clean the whole piston circumference. I clean all of the pistons and press them back in, then I pump the lever again and watch each piston for one that’s sticking. I work the piston in and out until I get all of them lubed and free and moving out together. Do this every year at the minimum.
The brake Piston seals job is to retract the piston. Pump it and watch. You’ll see the pistons go out and then back just a little bit. Seals can go bad over the years. Then it’s time for a rebuild. All much less likely if you flush your brake fluid every two years.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
521 Posts
I like to pump the lever and extend the pistons out, I then use a shoelace with brake fluid on it to clean the whole piston circumference. I clean all of the pistons and press them back in, then I pump the lever again and watch each piston for one that’s sticking. I work the piston in and out until I get all of them lubed and free and moving out together. Do this every year at the minimum.
The brake Piston seals job is to retract the piston. Pump it and watch. You’ll see the pistons go out and then back just a little bit. Seals can go bad over the years. Then it’s time for a rebuild. All much less likely if you flush your brake fluid every two years.
This is great preventive maintenance (whether by shoestring or toothbrush). I don't know why so many are willing to spend so much on exhaust, bling, and performance mods (that I like as much as the next guy), but so few are willing to do regular brake maintenance beyond changing pads. Going is optional, stopping is not...

Sent from my Moto Z (2) using Tapatalk
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2 Posts
Thats really dragging, I've never seen one like that, but after 5000+ miles, brake dust/debris can cause pistons to hang up and you are losing power and efficiency due to the drag. In extreme cases it may be dangerous.

Like others have said just grab a toothbrush, dish soap and, water. Make sure theres plenty of bubbles. Remove your front calipers on the bike along with the brake pads. With the brush, clean the pistons off. Squeeze the lever slowly to reveal more of the piston to clean. Be absolutely careful though because pistons can pop out when depressing the lever too much. At times, ou will have to push the pistons in, but again, be very careful as pushing one piston in can push the others out! If one is hung up and you can't reveal it to clean, you can hold the others back so the pressure can focus on that one piston to move. After they are all clean you will see them all move eventually when pressing the lever.

After cleaning pistons you will need to align the radial calipers back when re-installing, as incorrect re-installation can also cause drag. First as long as the wheel in straight in the forks, finger tight the calipers bolts. Then squeeze the brake lever down( zip ties work great too) as you torque down the caliper bolts to spec. Having the brakes squeezed ensures they they will be most aligned after release.

I don't mess with grease on the pins for the front caliper as there is not too much movement there(they are also exposed). Just make sure the pins are clean.

For the rear you will also want to clean the piston but usually it's a slide caliper. Look up a video on YouTube you to clean/maintain a slide pin caliper(plenty of automotive ones), but basically you should grease those pins as they are sealed.

If cleaning hasn't been done in a while, doing this method always makes the bike run more smoothly. You will have less drag so you may have to get used to the bike again(it will feel like less engine braking!)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,840 Posts
The calipers are stepped where they meet the mounts. Self aligning.
 
  • Like
Reactions: abe57
1 - 15 of 15 Posts
Top