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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm expecting my new springs from Stoltec to arrive tomorrow and I have a question about the springs swap.. When I get the springs installed are they just drop in or is it a full fork rebuild?

The shop I spoke to quoted me $50 for drop in and $200 for a rebuild plus $20 for oil. I just want to be a bit knowledgeable when I go in.
 

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I'm expecting my new springs from Stoltec to arrive tomorrow and I have a question about the springs swap.. When I get the springs installed are they just drop in or is it a full fork rebuild?

The shop I spoke to quoted me $50 for drop in and $200 for a rebuild plus $20 for oil. I just want to be a bit knowledgeable when I go in.
Can be done as a drop in and even on the bike if one has the right tools.

Tool in picture can be used on the fork while still on the bike .

Display picture, normally the retainer screws / pins go in the holes of the spacer if available.

A bike I did a few days ago didn't have a spacer, so clamped on the spring, instead.

The assembly you see doesn't have to come out of the fork.

 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Can be done as a drop in and even on the bike if one has the right tools.

Tool in picture can be used on the fork while still on the bike .

Display picture, normally the retainer screws / pins go in the holes of the spacer if available.

A bike I did a few days ago didn't have a spacer, so clamped on the spring, instead.

The assembly you see doesn't have to come out of the fork.

Great thank you! You just saved me about $170.00

So they can install my springs for $50 and they said another $50 to set up the sag on front and rear for my weight.
 

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Great thank you! You just saved me about $170.00

So they can install my springs for $50 and they said another $50 to set up the sag on front and rear for my weight.
There is so much info on this site, you could do your own sag in a few minutes.

What is your weight ?

Do you already have some aftermarket springs ?

Rear shock OEM or aftermarket ?
 
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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There is so much info on this site, you could do your own sag in a few minutes.

What is your weight ?

Do you already have some aftermarket springs ?

Rear shock OEM or aftermarket ?
I ordered the 0.90 kg/mm springs from Stoltec and the rear shock is totally stock. I weigh around 185 without gear so I'd guess I'm around 205 ish all gear on.
 

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I ordered the 0.90 kg/mm springs from Stoltec and the rear shock is totally stock. I weigh around 185 without gear so I'd guess I'm around 205 ish all gear on.
You can use a zip tie on the front fork to measure difference between no weight and rider weight on bike for 35 mm sag.

Your weight , 90 springs will likely be about 1/2 your preload adjustment.

10 wt. oil, max dampening adjustment ( screws all the way in )

Stock rear shock, max preload, max dampening adjustment.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
You can use a zip tie on the front fork to measure difference between no weight and rider weight on bike for 35 mm sag.

Your weight , 90 springs will likely be about 1/2 your preload adjustment.

10 wt. oil, max dampening adjustment ( screws all the way in )

Stock rear shock, max preload, max dampening adjustment.
Thanks for the help! Much appreciated.
 

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Marthy had an earlier post on this. He made a tool to compress the spring. I used this and it wasn't bad. I'd really like the Race Tech tool, but it wouldn't be used enough by me to justify it. The homemade tool used a pvc pipe coupler, 3/8" bolts and nuts and a couple of ratchet straps. The old spring is easier to take off than the new one is to put on due to the higher pressure.
 

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Marthy had an earlier post on this. He made a tool to compress the spring. I used this and it wasn't bad. I'd really like the Race Tech tool, but it wouldn't be used enough by me to justify it. The homemade tool used a pvc pipe coupler, 3/8" bolts and nuts and a couple of ratchet straps. The old spring is easier to take off than the new one is to put on due to the higher pressure.
No one said you have to but it from Race Tech. I scabbed this together in less than 30 minutes. It isn't pretty, but it works.:cool:

fork compressor sm.jpg
 

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Got a service manual? There are specific things in there that are real helpful. Be sure to back off the preload and damping adjusters before disassembly. Double check the damping adjuster is backed off before reassembly.

Also-

Keep your work area very clean, and be very mindful of any foreign material that could enter the fork tube, oil, tools, etc. You're going to be real bummed if you get a some shit (metal, dirt) down in there that embeds itself in the bushings' teflon surface and then proceeds to scratch the hell out of the inner tube surface. The springs themselves are known to be dirty. Wash em down good with ether or rubbing alcohol or whatever solvent you have around that'll dry clean before install.

I made a compressor out of some allthread, a 3" steel conduit coupler, nuts and washers, and a little shim to hold things in place for taking the top cap off. Cost was under $10. Some people have made these from pvc, wood, but I wanted something stronger. Just need an extra pair of hands and enough body mass to push the spring down. I'm 190 lbs and can compress a .95 enough by hand to get the job done. Can't see in the pic, but the allthread was filed down at the ends to fit in the spacer, and the conduit coupler was tapped to accept the allthread. The nuts/washer lock it all in place so no flexing wobbling when pushing down.

IMG_2464s.jpg
 

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This is what happens to the fork tubes when foreign material gets down in there. We're talking TINY bits of metal; a fraction of a millimeter, but sharp enough to do damage.


IMG_2466.jpg
IMG_2469.jpg
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
This is what happens to the fork tubes when foreign material gets down in there. We're talking TINY bits of metal; a fraction of a millimeter, but sharp enough to do damage.


View attachment 3736
View attachment 3737
Ouch! I'm just gonna pay the $50 and get it done by the pros. I don't have a workshop or a good assortment of tools so I'll just feel better if a knowledgeable suspension guy(or gal) installed the springs.
 

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Ouch is right.
I would take some rubbing alcohol, a brush, and some paper towels and sanitize the springs before you hand them over. Nothing wrong with making sure the parts are extra clean!
 

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Or pour some A-1 sauce on em and set em in front of my dog. They will be crystal clear in five minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
So I talked to the dealership about installing my Stoltec fork springs and I told them they should be just drop-in and they quoted me a shop time of 1.5 hours to swap out the springs but use the same oil as before. They told me the forks had to be completely removed from the bike. Are they just gouging me, I understood that the springs could be pulled out the top, once the preload caps are removed..?
 

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Did you talk with Stoltec about using oil a bit thicker? I would have expected that he'd recommend that along with the spring change.

I haven't worked on cartridge USD forks, seems more complicated than back in the day lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Did you talk with Stoltec about using oil a bit thicker? I would have expected that he'd recommend that along with the spring change.

I haven't worked on cartridge USD forks, seems more complicated than back in the day lol.
Yes Nick recommended 10 weight oil.
 
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I did my own. Bought the springs from Nick. Used 10w oil (in one leg). Used the tools that was posted here (thanks Marthy and others). Probably took me about 2 hours. While I was in there, I did the brake lines. A good bonding experience with the bike! Oh yeah, I took the forks out (6 pinch bolts).
 

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yes nick recommended 10 weight oil.
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i did my own. Bought the springs from nick. Used 10w oil (in one leg). Used the tools that was posted here (thanks marthy and others). Probably took me about 2 hours. While i was in there, i did the brake lines. A good bonding experience with the bike! Oh yeah, i took the forks out (6 pinch bolts).
 

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Lots of good info here but if you have never done much mechanical work before, forks are not the best place to start. I advise spending $50 to have the shop do it. But if you want to learn, go for it.
 
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