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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Just a quick question, may have already been answered, has anybody tried obtaining (there will be a few about secondahand Id imagine) and installing another stock working cartridge into the empty side, forgotten which was which, in essence having two functioning cartridges, resprung for your weight of course with heavier fork oil. Also the GIVI screen and handguard combo look and work brilliant, cuts out a shit load of wind blast, and they were very competitively priced, happy. Any responses to my fork question would be appreciated. :)
 

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The cartridge in the left fork does nothing but hold the bottom tube to the top tube.

The cartridge in the right fork tube has minimal compression and rebound damping.

I have not heard of another stock cartridge that is the same length as the fz09 so that prevents using r1/6 cartridges as an example. There might be something out there.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
I think my question is if I managed to obtain discarded right side standard fork internals (from a Ohlins or Adrienni? upgrade) would the whole thing simply screw into the left side, I would expect two working cartridges would double comp and rebound (with decent fork oil and correctly weighted springs), I know all about the standard forks, so can you swap out the standard internals from right to left. Thanks for the responses.
 

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There is at least one guy on the german mt 09 forum, that did this. And I also just completed my fork modification and now drive with 2 r/h stock cartridges in my mt 09, but have only driven it 30 min yet since the modification. i drive it with 10w motul oil and öhlins springs. but it is much firmer now than before.
 

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In theory, it would bolt right in. You'd end up with over twice the damping, which may or may not suit your weight and riding style. You still wouldn't have adjustable compression damping, so you need to ask yourself what exactly you're looking to get...
 

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Can't remember if I asked this before...
Could you run standard internals in both legs, with different valving? So one leg has stiff rebound and soft compression, and the other has stiff compression and soft rebound?
The screw on the top would technically operate comp and rebound, but because the valving is so different, it would be similar to having separate Comp and rebound?
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Excellent, thanks for the responses, yep Im a very heavy bugger at 110kg plus gear (solid and tall not fat he he :)) and I ride with a heavy reliance on the front (tend to wear front tyres faster than rears), Im thinking if I go to 7.5w fork oil from 10w, heavier springs and two working cartridges this should be a good match for the ZX10R shock with the standard MT 09 spring, looking for a cheaper solution to sort the front out for 90% of the riding I do. Again thanks for the responses.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There is at least one guy on the german mt 09 forum, that did this. And I also just completed my fork modification and now drive with 2 r/h stock cartridges in my mt 09, but have only driven it 30 min yet since the modification. i drive it with 10w motul oil and öhlins springs. but it is much firmer now than before.
Thanks for that, just let me know how it works out for you, in terms of the improved control it provides, was it a screw in fit?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Just obtained some discarded fork internals cheap, this will be an interesting experiment :)
 

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Can't remember if I asked this before...
Could you run standard internals in both legs, with different valving? So one leg has stiff rebound and soft compression, and the other has stiff compression and soft rebound?
The screw on the top would technically operate comp and rebound, but because the valving is so different, it would be similar to having separate Comp and rebound?
Regardless of how you revalve the cartridges, the adjusters up top will only adjust rebound damping. The only way to 'flip' the adjustment is if you modify the cartridge assembly itself. After you consider the investment in the parts, revalving, and modification, you're going to be well over the price of a standard revalve and approaching the cost of a full replacement cartridge kit. Anything can be done - but is it worthwhile? In this case, there are easier options.

Just obtained some discarded fork internals cheap, this will be an interesting experiment :)
I'll be interested in hearing your thoughts. You aren't that heavy (by American standards). As a baseline, start with a set of 0.95 kg/mm springs. Run 5wt oil, though. You'll have over twice the damping of the stock setup and anything higher will likely be too much.

For most guys, the firmer springs and heavier oil is enough to placate the their ire with the stock suspension. The heavier oil has the net effect of raising rebound damping (which is what is really needed) while also increasing compression damping (necessary to control dive - which is mostly controlled by the springs). The challenge is that the factory valving goes from soft and cushy on compression to borderline harsh on big hits with the heavier oil. The shim stacks need to be revised to give proper low and high speed response.

I'm all for experiments, though, and it sounds like you got a deal. Will be awaiting your feedback. Good luck!
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thanks for the advice, and yep I will keep you informed of how the who shebang works out, much as Id love to go ball outs with a/m cartridges and fancy shocks, I just cant justify the cost (family man and all), going to the 10w oil made a big difference. Down the track I may go down the whole gold valve route and do both sides perhaps, I just need a solution that will do for a couple of years, the bike will be mine for a long time so down the track I may go ball deeps in fancy Ohlins Gear.
 
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Sorry for the bump, but I didn't want to start a new thread for a simple answer.

Can Someone Please Give Me A quick Step By Step As To How I Would Go About changing My Fork oil?
 

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Thanks for that, just let me know how it works out for you, in terms of the improved control it provides, was it a screw in fit?
Yes, it was plug + play. you might need a tool to stop the cartridge from turning, while you unscrew the 8mm allen bolt, but other than that no special tools (except the spring compressor). since the weather in germany just sucks at the moment, i still haven't driven it any more...
 

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FZ09 Fork Oil Change Photos by RichBinAZ | Photobucket



Anyone else thought about changing the fork and shock dampening by using the valves from the FJ-09?
Thank you for that link, I have been looking all over for a DIY fork spring compressor! I plan on putting in springs and oil in mine.

I have not taken the forks apart yet, however if someone just wanted to replace the fork oil could they not just drop a small hose into the fork and draw out the oil with a syringe and measure the oil removed - and then replace with the same amount of heavier oil? I have done this on other bikes. If not, maybe the forks can be removed and turned upside down to collect the old oil, then measure and replace with the same amount (no need to compress springs). All this is assuming Yamaha put the right amount of oil into the fork in the first place :)
 

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Thank you for that link, I have been looking all over for a DIY fork spring compressor! I plan on putting in springs and oil in mine.

I have not taken the forks apart yet, however if someone just wanted to replace the fork oil could they not just drop a small hose into the fork and draw out the oil with a syringe and measure the oil removed - and then replace with the same amount of heavier oil? I have done this on other bikes. If not, maybe the forks can be removed and turned upside down to collect the old oil, then measure and replace with the same amount (no need to compress springs). All this is assuming Yamaha put the right amount of oil into the fork in the first place :)
I wouldn't recommend it. Remove the forks from the bike, remove the springs and damping hardware, drain the oil and measure it.
 

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I guess it depends on the age of the bike. If you are changing over to heavier fork oil on a practically new bike I would hope everything in there is still like new.
 

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I guess it depends on the age of the bike. If you are changing over to heavier fork oil on a practically new bike I would hope everything in there is still like new.
The moving parts inside the fork break in just like engine parts, leaving behind small pieces of debris. Not much - but you might as well get it out. With conventional forks it's not as big of a deal because not as much of the oil is above the seals like on our Upside Down forks.
Upside Down forks are stiffer and lighter than conventional forks, but a lot harder to service. If I knew of a reliable shortcut then I would tell you. The main problem is going to be getting a tube to go down in far enough to reach the oil without compressing the springs and getting the damping hardware out of the way. I don't think you'll be able to make a positive difference without it being more work than just taking it all apart the right way. Pull the forks, compress the springs, remove the damping and the springs, drain the oil. Reverse the order and reassemble.
 
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