Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner
1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
20 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hey guys,

Picked up my MT-07 a couple of weeks ago. Having a great time on it but unfortunately on Thursday I came off.

There's a lovely road (A1060) that runs from Bishop's Stortford down to Chelmsford that I have been enjoying over the past couple of weeks - don't suppose any of you live in the area and know the road? Anyway, I was on my way back from Chelmsford on Thursday afternoon and hit the left hander (UK so I was on the inside) that I always enjoy, just before Hatfield Heath. I'm a complete novice rider but the bike is so confidence inspiring I just went at it too fast. As I got half way round the corner I thought for a split second that I might swing out on to the other side of the road (where a van was fast approaching in the opposite lane). That split second thought coupled with the van scared me and I made the worst move I could have made... I slammed my brakes on. Before I got a bike I read about people making this mistake and always told myself, "Why would anyone do that?!" But in the shock of it all it just happened. Anyway the inevitable happened and I headed straight forward, across into the other lane and onto the grass on the other side of the road, wibbly wobbled a bit and dropped the bike.

The bloke in the van was very nice and did well to calm me down as I was in a fair amount of shock. My bike was laying on it's right and I was terrified to pick it up and look at the damage. Eventually I picked it up and had a look. The panel that holds on the right foot peg and rear brake lever/pedal had snapped clean off (see link below for pictures). At first I could not believe it, I thought that the worst had happened and was absolutely livid. So I chilled out for a bit then tried to start her up. She started absolutely no problem and luckily the damage only seems to be cosmetic thus far. I took a very slow ride home with my hazards on and one foot hanging off. After the initial shock of things I have now realised that the damage isn't too bad and it could have gone A LOT worse. I had my full leathers on and didn't feel a thing.

Yamaha MT-07 Crash Photos by JoeBrown2811 | Photobucket

After inspection it looks like I need 3 different parts replacing. The rear brake lever/pedal (bent) and 2 panels that hold the pedal and foot peg on (snapped). You should be able to see what I mean in the pictures. I've identified the part numbers but the only website I can find that sells them is one in Germany and just wanted to know if anyone on here can suggest anywhere I can look for spares for a brand new bike? I'm going to ring my dealer and ask for a quote but I really can't see them being any cheaper than the guys in Germany (160 EUR for all three parts and they'll ship them to me for 15 EUR).

Anyway any tips you guys can give me on where to go for the spares will be much appreciated.

Thanks.

Joe
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
Luckily, bikes can be fixed/replaced. Great to hear you were riding in full gear and came out of it well.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,008 Posts
I'm glad you're walking & talking and bike damage is light as such things go, it could have been worse. I don't know the Euro parts market, but for such a new bike etc that German site might be as good a deal as you'll find.

About the "didn't feel a thing" yes your leathers etc helped, but also you have a lot of adrenaline going (followed by shock), it happens so fast, and your brain tends to concentrate on the visual. Even if you do get injured in such a crash you might not feel it for a few minutes, it is important to take an inventory of your body right away.

Yeah, one of the most important riding skills is judging the speed to enter every turn with, it takes constant practice. I'm an experienced rider coming back after not riding for 10 years, that's one of the skills at the top of my list to get back.

And practice "what if?" while riding. If you are mid turn and something unexpected happens do you ride it out? Get on the brakes in a controlled way? Etc. You can practice on your own, away from traffic. Also if you can take more riding schools, those can be great. At some point look into track schools for street riders wanting to improve their skills.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
112 Posts
Glad to hear you're okay brother! When I started out my cousin who is a track nut, recommended Keith Code's "Twist of the Wrist" series to me. Read the books and watch the videos and your knowledge will skyrocket instantly! That stuff will help you tremendously. It helps to find an empty space (the bigger, the better) and practice everything over and over and over. It is amazing what you can train your muscles and mind to do in an emergency situation. Good luck on the repairs, you're on the right track to mounting that horse again and having some more fun!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
657 Posts
Reading up on the basics of bike dynamics is for sure recommended. I second the Keith Code books.

Next is to go and apply those inputs to the bike and understand them. They'll eventually become second nature.

If coming up to a corner, and you think you are too hot, look where the bike needs to go and it will follow. Yes your first instinct is to brake, but that will stand the bike up and make it want to straighten it's line. Roll off the throttle and the bike will lean over further and tighten up the turning radius.

It's always good to learn from your mistakes. Ride safe!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,330 Posts
Good to hear you were not hurt!

Get some training and practice a lot!

As an MSF ridercoach I see lots of areas of improvement in what you describe and most need you to work with a knowledgeable trainer to get over the bad habits you already have developed.

Some examples from your story:
1) Corner technique
2) Where you are looking
3) Braking technique
4) Target fixation, how to avoid it and what to do about it
5) Situational awareness
6) Other ways to deal with the situation where you over cooked a corner entry...

plus many more.

If you were local I would be more than happy to help out but I am in California so that won't help you much...
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
24 Posts
As all have said. You are in one piece that's the main thing. I'm only assuming, but there are a lot of experienced/old farts on here. The reason they are still riding bikes
is because they have made similar mistakes as you have done and learnt from it. (you will do more and learn more) And you will never forget that crash.
Fortunately for you and unfortunately for many bikers, their 1st crash is their last.
Can't help with the spares thing. But top tip when the mt is mended: just be aware of wildlife running out eg deer and especially pheasants.... they really hurt when they
hit you in the lid at 30mph!!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
663 Posts
As all have said. You are in one piece that's the main thing. I'm only assuming, but there are a lot of experienced/old farts on here. The reason they are still riding bikes
is because they have made similar mistakes as you have done and learnt from it. (you will do more and learn more) And you will never forget that crash.
Fortunately for you and unfortunately for many bikers, their 1st crash is their last.
Can't help with the spares thing. But top tip when the mt is mended: just be aware of wildlife running out eg deer and especially pheasants.... they really hurt when they
hit you in the lid at 30mph!!
Right you are XT. I learned the lesson the same way on my Honda CB125S back in about 1976. I went in to a curve too fast, panic mode set in and I got on the binders. I ended up leaving the road way and landing in someone's yard. No damage, or injury, just a serious wake up call. I have never repeated the stunt. Luckily for me there was no opposing traffic that day. The lesson was inexpensive, yet effective.
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top