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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm not sure if this is because of now I handle the controls but sometimes when I need to make abrupt slow downs/stops I would pull in the clutch and start downshifting all the way to first gear. I sometimes get a bad grid when going into first or it would grind so bad, I'll prevent me from going into first. I've came upon this issue three times during my 1 month of ownership. Every occurrence, the engine had been warmed up.

I'm on my second oil change of yamalube with 1100 miles. Any one come across this issue before on any of your bikes?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I'm probably dropping 2-3 gears. When I get closer to first gear, I am probably going less than 15 mph and I have the clutch held down the whole time.
 

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Adjust your shifter so it is 1/8-1/4" higher and make sure your clutch freeplay is adjusted properly.

Iif it happens with different shoes then note which shoes make it worse.
 

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Sounds more like a rider error to me, first gear isn't the right gear you should be on, keep in mind that; you don't need to be on first gear or engine break to first gear unless you coming to a full stop. Even then; I still won't downshift all the way to first , what happens is your bike goes to neutral and then to 1st. If you are down shifting fast enough, smoothly, and your pattern is right; you shouldn't experience that.
 

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I'm not sure if this is because of now I handle the controls but sometimes when I need to make abrupt slow downs/stops I would pull in the clutch and start downshifting all the way to first gear. I sometimes get a bad grid when going into first or it would grind so bad, I'll prevent me from going into first. I've came upon this issue three times during my 1 month of ownership. Every occurrence, the engine had been warmed up.

I'm on my second oil change of yamalube with 1100 miles. Any one come across this issue before on any of your bikes?
Try doing a "normal" down shift. Blip the throttle as you pull in the clutch and shift down. Only drop one gear at a time and allow the bike to slow down some between shifts.

When you do the final shift to first gear you will probably be rolling at under 10 mph. This is how I have shifted bikes since I was 10 years old, I am now 61.

I never have had a first gear grinding problem using this method.
 

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If you're going to drop down more than two gears at a time, you've got to release the clutch to allow the transmission internals to realign. Unlike some of the other posters, I do downshift all the way to first when I need to go really slowly (like in the alley behind my house) and I will shift more than one transmission click per clutch pull, but two gears is the max.

When slowing to a stop from top gear, try: clutch in -- down to 5th, down to 4th -- clutch out. Clutch in -- down to 3th, down to 2th -- clutch out. Clutch in -- 1st -- clutch out OR just hold it in.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Adjust your shifter so it is 1/8-1/4" higher and make sure your clutch freeplay is adjusted properly.


Iif it happens with different shoes then note which shoes make it worse.
I was actually considering moving it down a lower because of the angle of my legs when riding. I should be able to downshift without lifting the back of my heel right? I wear the same riding boots every time I'm on my bike.


Sounds more like a rider error to me, first gear isn't the right gear you should be on, keep in mind that; you don't need to be on first gear or engine break to first gear unless you coming to a full stop. Even then; I still won't downshift all the way to first , what happens is your bike goes to neutral and then to 1st. If you are down shifting fast enough, smoothly, and your pattern is right; you shouldn't experience that.
In these particular circumstances, I am preparing myself to come to a full stop and would like to be in first just in case I need to power my way out of an escalated situation.


Try doing a "normal" down shift. Blip the throttle as you pull in the clutch and shift down. Only drop one gear at a time and allow the bike to slow down some between shifts.

When you do the final shift to first gear you will probably be rolling at under 10 mph. This is how I have shifted bikes since I was 10 years old, I am now 61.


I never have had a first gear grinding problem using this method.
Normally I would downshift properly with throttle blipping but I am only experiencing this issue under certain emergency circumstances.


If you're going to drop down more than two gears at a time, you've got to release the clutch to allow the transmission internals to realign. Unlike some of the other posters, I do downshift all the way to first when I need to go really slowly (like in the alley behind my house) and I will shift more than one transmission click per clutch pull, but two gears is the max.


When slowing to a stop from top gear, try: clutch in -- down to 5th, down to 4th -- clutch out. Clutch in -- down to 3th, down to 2th -- clutch out. Clutch in -- 1st -- clutch out OR just hold it in.
My mind doesn't work that fast when it comes to properly downshifting quickly in emergency situations, I guess I need to practice this a little more.


Thanks all for the helpful tips!
 

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If you're going to drop down more than two gears at a time, you've got to release the clutch to allow the transmission internals to realign. Unlike some of the other posters, I do downshift all the way to first when I need to go really slowly (like in the alley behind my house) and I will shift more than one transmission click per clutch pull, but two gears is the max.

When slowing to a stop from top gear, try: clutch in -- down to 5th, down to 4th -- clutch out. Clutch in -- down to 3th, down to 2th -- clutch out. Clutch in -- 1st -- clutch out OR just hold it in.
Never applied to any bike I have owned.

Every bike in the last 30+ years worked the same: I could be going 100mph in top gear, pull in the clutch and tap-tap-tap ... down to first without releasing the clutch even once.

The fact that the engine is spinning and the rear wheel is spinning will align the gears. The gears actually don't align teeth to teeth when you are shifting gears as they are already meshed all the time.

What is engaging is the "dogs" (4-6 blocks or teeth) that stick out the sides of the gears. The gears shift side to side slightly to engage/disengage the dogs but the teeth of the gears generally remain engaged all the time.

On racing bikes (especially drag racing) a common trick is to undercut the dogs so the engaging surface of the dogs pulls in the gear they are engaging.


I was actually considering moving it down a lower because of the angle of my legs when riding. I should be able to downshift without lifting the back of my heel right? I wear the same riding boots every time I'm on my bike.
nope move the shifter up up, that way the same movement on your ankle effectively moves the shifter down more thus completing the downshift instead of not quite completing the downshift.

Alternatively, you could be sitting on the bike wrong.

Proper positioning is for the balls of your feet to be on the peg.

When it is time to shift, you move your foot forward to the shifter, either above (for down shifts) or below (for upshifts) and then move your foot back to the ball of your foot on the pegs.

It is a bad habit to ride around with your foot hovering under or over the shifter as this can lead to unintended shifting and false neutrals when you hit a bump and your toe accidentally bumps the shifter.

Also having the ball of your foot on the peg allows you to weight the pegs much better to keep you better connected to the bike and give you more cornering control.
 
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