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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)


You will need the following:
a. Spark plug socket or extended regular socket. Spark plugs seem to be a pretty standard size so check your sockets against your new plugs to determine which size socket you need.
b. Ball-End hex key set
c. Pliers to get at the hose clamps
d. a soft spot to put the Gas tank
e. A rag to wrap around the end of the fuel hose.
f. Socket Extensions
g. Universal Elbow
h. Ratchet
i. Vacuum hose (3/8in or 9.5mm)
j. Feeler gauges
k. Set of sockets, (19mm socket for crank)
l. Small 3/8in drive torque wrench that can do 7ft/lbs
m. Magnet tool for buckets/shims
p. A PDF OF THE SERVICE MANUAL
q. New cam chain tensioner gasket


Photo guide of steps 1 - 8 are shown in my DIY SPARKPLUG THREAD since a post can only have 32 images.


1. Remove the fake air scoops. (2 push pins, 1 hex bolt [each side]) Give it a firm pull to remove.
2. Remove the plastic tank cover up by the front of the tank (4 push pins)
3. Remove the tank (4 hex bolts)
3a. Lift tank slightly to unplug breather hose, unplug overflow hose, unclip fuel pump wiring harness, Unplug fuel line (slide orange clip down, press both blue buttons on the sides to remove. there is a valve to keep the fuel from coming out of the tank so dont worry about leaks.) wrap rag around the end of the fuel hose to catch the drips
4. Unbolt Airbox, unplug ECU wire harness and move it aside (3 hex bolts)
4a. Unclip vacuum hoses (2x) from bottom of airbox
4b. You will need to loosen the three hose clamps on the intake runners, these are captive and will not be lost into the depths of the bike. It was helpful to use a hex key with a ball end to get at the hose clamps from odd angles. Loosen and lift/remove airbox.
5. Remove AIS system by sliding it off the mount on the fan shroud, and loosening hose clips to the engine. Unclip blue connector to wire harness.
6. Unclip wiring harness from coil packs (3x)
7. Remove coil packs by hand. (They're stuck in there nice and snug, just keep working it back and forth. Might help to find someone w small hands since tools may damage the plastic coil packs.
8. Using extensions and elbows remove spark plugs. I also used a piece of vacuum hose to remove the plugs since they tend to stay in there when you remove the socket.



9. Unmount horn and let it hang. This gives you more clearance for the radiator.


10. Unmount radiator (2 bolts on top, one sliding rubber mount on bottom)


11. Remove hose from this hard line. Zip tie it up and out of the way to keep it from dribbling coolant. Tape off the hard nipple on the radiator to prevent drips.



12. Unclip radiator fan wiring harness and remove the 4 black bolts to remove radiator fan. With the radiator fully unmounted and leaning against the front fender, you should have clearance to remove the valve cover and still keep your radiator attached



13. Remove the 4 valve cover bolts. One is longer than the others so take note of position. Remove the valve cover and take care to maintain the rubber gasket. You can reuse this if you do not tear it. Be sure not to dent/damage the rear of your radiator when pulling out your valve cover.



14. Remove the Crank cover and timing window bolt


Now it is time to make sure you've got that service manual handy. (p.111)

15. Insert your 19mm Socket and rotate the crank counterclockwise until piston 1 reaches TDC. TDC is indicated by the horizontal line on the crank and the cam lobes pointing opposite of each other.


16. Check valve clearances with feeler gauge

  • Check valve clearances for exhaust and intake for cylinder 1
  • Rotate crank counter-clockwise 270 degrees
  • Check valve clearances for exhaust and intake for cylinder 2
  • Rotate crank counter-clockwise 270 degrees
  • Check valve clearances for exhaust and intake for cylinder 3



These bikes are known to have very tight exhaust valves. At 23k miles, I found that my Exhaust valves were approximately .14mm and my intake valves were all in spec. If you have reached this point and all of your valves are in spec, congratulations, you're a lucky one and you can put your bike back together doing the reverse of the disassembly shown above. If you are like the majority of owners, your exhaust valves are tight and you will need to remove the cam chain tensioner, cams, re-shim, and replace the cams, and the cam chain tensioner. You can find instructions to remove the cams starting on p.228 of the service manual.



17. Turn crank counter-clockwise to find BTDC for cylinder 1. The indicator(a) looks like a small triangle.


18. Remove the cam chain tensioner (CCT). Undo the inner bolt first (pictured), followed by the outer bolt. (the center bolt is actually a cap for the CCT) You may find that your CCT will pop out since it is under pressure. When you have removed the CCT, DO NOT rotate your crank position until it has been installed and under tension again.


19. Remove camshaft caps. To prevent damage to the cams, caps, or cylinder head, loosen in multiple stages and a crisscross pattern. I cracked the fasteners loose first, and then followed up again to completely back them out. Pictured below is the pattern I went with. Note the numbers cast into the large cap, they are helpful for re-torquing. The Two smaller caps are Marked EL and IL for Exhaust and Intake respectively. This is the pattern I went with.


20. Tie a strong thick wire around the cam chain to or something to prevent it from falling into the engine casing.

21. Remove camshafts (you can keep the sprockets attached). For good measure, keep track of which camshaft is EXHAUST and INTAKE

22. Utilize your magnet tool to pull the valve buckets off the top of the valve springs. When I removed my buckets, the shims came with them. Ensure you keep track of which buckets, and shims came from which valve. This will ensure that you are able to calculate the correct adjustments needed.
22a. Calculate the size of the new shims you need to bring you back into spec. Shims are only sold in integers of five (155, 160, 165...etc). Shims are marked with a 3 digit number on the back(a). (Example: 158 = 1.58mm).
22b. Install new shims on their receptors on the valves(1) and reinstall the bucket on top(2).


23. Reinstall the intake camshaft, then the exhaust camshaft (p.231). Ensure that your crank is still in position BTDC. If you haven't touched it you should see the little triangle mark in the timing window still. Reinstall with punch marks on cams facing upwards. These will later align with vertical marks once you install the camshaft caps.


24. Replace camshaft caps in their previous positions. Lubricate camshaft bolts with engine oil before installing (I just dipped them in some of the motor oil in the top of the engine). Torque to 7.2ft/lbs
24a. Torque down camshaft cap (A) in the sequence cast into the cap. Mirror that same sequence while torquing down caps (B) and (C) with the sequence pictured below.


25. Reinstall camshaft chain. Check again to ensure that the punch marks are still aligned with the vertical marks on your caps as show in step 23.

26. Reinstall CCT via the following:
26a. Apply compression to CCT with one hand while turning the hex key counter-clockwise. Removal of the hex key will allow the mechanism to extend. Try it out in your hand to see what will happen when you remove the adjuster key while the CCT is mounted to the motor. You can either utilize a trimmed down hex key, or spend $$$ to buy the OEM tool.


26b. Install CCT with new gasket using loctite on the two mounting bolts on the outside. The center bolt does not require loctite. Below is the setup I used to get around purchasing the OEM tool. In the center, you can see my trimmed down hex key. I still had enough clearance to use a standard hex key to tediously tighten down the inside mounting bolt. I tightened the outside bolt first, and the inside bolt second. A mirror of the removal process. If you are a better person than me, and can get a torque wrench on the CCT mounting bolts, the torque spec is 7.2ft/lb with loctite the cap bolt in the center has a torque spec of 5.1ft/lbs


26c. Remove your trimmed down your adjuster tool from the center hole and allow the CCT to tension the cam chain. It should pop into place just as you tested in step 26a. Check to ensure there is solid tension on the cam chains before you attempt the next step.

27. Rotate crank by hand, slowly, counter-clockwise to ensure that valves, cams, and crank are all working together again, in time.

28. Remeasure valve clearances to verify you did your math correctly. If you selected the correct shims, you should now be in spec for your valve clearances.

29. Everything good? Reinstall all your lil bits.
  • Timing mark Access Bolt 11ft/lbs
  • Crankshaft End Cover 7.2ft/lbs
  • Rubber Valve Cover Gasket
  • Valve Cover - 4x bolts (3 short, 1 long) 7.2ft/lbs
  • Spark Plugs 9.4ft/lbs
  • Spark Plug Coils (ensure they are fully seated against the valve cover)
  • Plug Coil Wiring Harness
  • Fan to Radiator
  • Plug in Radiator Fan
  • Reattach Small Coolant Hose
  • Radiator
  • Horn
  • AIS
  • Airbox
  • ECU and Wiring Harness
  • Fuel Tank - Attempt to run motor before reinstalling bodywork and bolting down fuel tank
  • Body Work

This all may look difficult, but it's not Ducati difficult.
:BangHead:
 

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Your thoroughness and photo documentation is off the chart! Great work and sure to be the definitive go to for those wishing to tackle this task. I've made it a sticky, so that it will remain near the top of the guides/how to sub-forum. Your contribution is what makes FZ09.org a great place to be. Thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 · (Edited)
Your thoroughness and photo documentation is off the chart! Great work and sure to be the definitive go to for those wishing to tackle this task. I've made it a sticky, so that it will remain near the top of the guides/how to sub-forum. Your contribution is what makes FZ09.org a great place to be. Thanks!
Glad you think it is helpful! is there any way to lift the 32 image limit per post? It would be nice to put everything in one place.
 

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I don't know about the photo limit. I'll pass this by the administrator. But, I will delete all the other posts in this thread so that only your posts are in the thread. That should keep it tidy.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 · (Edited)
I don't know about the photo limit. I'll pass this by the administrator. But, I will delete all the other posts in this thread so that only your posts are in the thread. That should keep it tidy.
I believe the error was indicating a cap of photos per post. I don't know if there is a cap per thread. It would be good to keep comments open so people can correct me and/or ask for clarifications as other people attempt this themselves.

Also if anyone knows how/where to host a service manual please let me know. I can post up a link and the more copies people have the better.
 

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Just did this and you don't have to replace cams unless they are out of spec and if you have low mileage most likely you won't need them... And at #25 on his list is what got my brother and I in a big mess..nothing is said to pull the chain from the front up and over the front cam sprocket then over the rear cam sprocket " making sure that the dimples on the cams are still lined up" and have all the slack in the chain on the CCT side and it helps to have another set of hands to hold it in place while you install the CCT and release it ! Also it helps to remover the lower side case cover to be sure all slack in the chain IS on the CCT side and none on the front side ! I bought a kit Hot Cams for the shims... The book directions are really half assed if you have never done this B4 !
We did have to replace every Exhaust shim to get it in spec.and all the intake where fine ..they where all tight and that is with 28,000 miles on her....
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
is really necessary to replace the cams? and what store do you recommend to get the valve kit and if necessary the cams?
You do not need to replace the cams - they should last the lifetime of the motorcycle. - If by "valve kit" you mean "shim kit", any local shop that does the valve service should be able to sell you the individual shims for a few bucks.

...And at #25 on his list is what got my brother and I in a big mess..nothing is said to pull the chain from the front up and over the front cam sprocket then over the rear cam sprocket " making sure that the dimples on the cams are still lined up" and have all the slack in the chain on the CCT side and it helps to have another set of hands to hold it in place while you install the CCT and release it ! Also it helps to remover the lower side case cover to be sure all slack in the chain IS on the CCT side and none on the front side ! I bought a kit Hot Cams for the shims... The book directions are really half assed if you have never done this B4 !
We did have to replace every Exhaust shim to get it in spec.and all the intake where fine ..they where all tight and that is with 28,000 miles on her....
Just got your PMs and glad to hear that everything worked out. I don't recall if I had the same issue as you did when I did my service.
 

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So the scariest part of this type of work for me is getting the timing right. I saw the "make sure the punch on the cam is pointing straight up"... Are there any markings on the cam sprockets? I just did my first personal valve clearance check a few months back (on my WR450) and those cams have dimples on the sprockets to ensure you have them timed right (see below image). To me (someone timid/a noob); if the only thing on the cam side to ensure you've got timed right is a punch on the camshaft itself that seems like a point of concern. Maybe I'm just over thinking it, but if you're only off by a single tooth i'd think it'd be hard to tell based off of just that punch on the shaft!

And one other question. After the 270* rotations to get to cylinders 2 and 3... Are there any markings or do you just have to judge TDC by the cam lobe positions? Again, wish such precision measurements... These are the types of things that worry me!

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On the left side cover is where you look into that little hole is where the timing mark is ( it's a straight line ) at this point the cam lobes face away from each other at cyl. # 1... the mark for the cam dimples that line up ( this mark is like a half arrow) you line all three and then place the chain over the sprockets from the front to the rear making sure the slack is towards the rear on the cct side. You do not have to remove the gears so you don't pay any attention to them ! Just the dimples and the angled mark..Hope this helps...
 

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Yeah I get the timing in general (i think), but my gripe is just that the engine isn't parallel with the ground. It's angled forward some. So I could see the possibility of having that dimple on the camshaft not pointing straight out due to perspective and accidentally having both cams off a tooth or two. That pic of the WR's cam's show the dimples on the cam sprockets and how they line up perfectly with the cylinder wall. When I do mine I'll likely mark the chain/cam sprockets and ensure the crank doesn't move while I have the camshafts out to be safe.

I guess they can only make things so dummy proof :p.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
I saw the "make sure the punch on the cam is pointing straight up"... Are there any markings on the cam sprockets?
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I dont recall if there are any markings on the cam sprockets. You will see that the caps are marked with a vertical line, so that you can ensure the cam is aligned properly.
 

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I dont recall if there are any markings on the cam sprockets. You will see that the caps are marked with a vertical line, so that you can ensure the cam is aligned properly.
^^ absolutely perfect! exactly what i needed to see haha. Thanks for pointing that out CJ!
 

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Valve Adjustment How To: shortcuts I found



Good morning cjymiller:

Thank you for your post, I found it very useful, in addition to the Haynes Manual and You Tube videos, in completing my FJ-09 valve adjustment this past week. I found your instructions clear and comprehensive, better yet comprehensible.

I also found some shortcuts, and rather than adding to the chatter, I thought I would suggest them to you first - if they work for you, you may want to modify your narrative to benefit future readers?

My observations are based on my experience with my 2015 FJ-09 - there may be differences from the FZ, but I don't think it would affect my suggestions.

Anyway, here goes:

1) The fuel tank: once the bolts are removed and the drain tubes disconnected, the tank can be ROTATED CLOCKWISE, and rested on padding on the rear subframe. There is no need to disconnect the power to the fuel pump or the fuel line - you'll need them to be connected anyway to run the engine when synchronizing the throttle bodies.

2) The Air Injection System - I didn't find it necessary to disconnect the electrical plug, just the hoses to the valve cover, and then move the assembly aside (I find that the plugs/wiring are fragile - the less I can disconnect them, the longer they last)

3) The Horn - I didn't remove it, and had lots of room to work around it.

4) The radiator hose: I did remove the hose to the overflow tank, but I did not remove the hose that runs over the valve cover - I let it stretch over the head to the radiator, that rested on the front fender once tipped forward. No chance of coolant dribble, and with care, the hose wasn't over stretched or pulled off of the radiator.

5) Not mentioned, but I did not disconnect the wires to the spark plug coil-in-cap (less disconnection - longer life).

6) I didn't find it necessary to remove the radiator fan from the radiator. A little squeeze around the shroud with the valve cover, but it all worked without too much fuss.

Otherwise, Textbook! Again, well written, and thanks.

PS:

Under the for what it's worth, did you mention that the Throttle Bodies should be synch'd after the valves are adjusted?

On the FJ, once the body work is off, it's also the easiest time to change the coolant, and to grease/adust the steering head bearings.

Thanks again.

Douglas (aka Fjr)

(PS - published with the blessing of cjymiller)
 

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I'm having a really hard time with the cam shafts and caps. When i try to put the caps in the camshafts they do not fit properly. The caps are always up in one side and down in the other... Do you guys have any kind of tips to properly place the caps?
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 · (Edited)
The caps are always up in one side and down in the other... Do you guys have any kind of tips to properly place the caps?
I recall having this same experience as well when I was re-assembling. Make sure that you're following the proper pattern to re torque the caps down. Start by threading all the bolts in by hand to prevent cross threading. Snug down the bolts in the proper order per the image below. Follow up by repeating that same pattern, this time torquing to spec.

Be aware, the torque spec on these is relatively light so do not over tighten when you are snugging the bolts down.

Engine Auto part Vehicle Car Automotive engine part
 

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I recall having this same experience as well when I was re-assembling. Make sure that you're following the proper pattern to re torque the caps down. Start by threading all the bolts in by hand to prevent cross threading. Snug down the bolts in the proper order per the image below. Follow up by repeating that same pattern, this time torquing to spec.

Be aware, the torque spec on these is relatively light so do not over tighten when you are snugging the bolts down.

View attachment 152008
Thanks. I'm securing the camchain with zip ties to maintain timing and i think that's the reason the caps don't seat properly. I am afraid to force them by tightening the bolts... Should i tight everything and then put the cam chain?
 
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