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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I posted this in another thread, but was asked to break it out into its own DIY thread, here are some basics for the 1st time tire changer:

its actually not all that hard...lots of youtube videos show how.
http://www.nomartirechanger.com/Articles.asp?ID=256#prettyPhoto

1. You need a valve stem core tool to let the air out
Amazon.com: Slime 20088 4-Way Valve Tool with 4 Valve Cores: Automotive


2. You definitely need a beadbreaker, my beadbuster is good:
Buy the BeadBuster XB-450 tire bead breaker today

the BeadBuster works well on ATV/UTV, streetbike, dirtbike, Cars, trucks, 4x4's, trailers, lawnmowers, etc, etc. Nothins else is as versatile for $99

, but honestly, if you are just breaking down streetbike tires, there are cheaper ones that will work all right, but not nearly as compact.
Motorcycle Bead Breaker
I've never seen this one, it looks like it might be small. I have had bad experience with Harbor Freight bead breakers in the past...basically you get what you pay for.

DON'T get the big C-Clamp tool by stop & Go, it sucks.


3. and the job can be finished with tire spoons...motion pro makes some decent ones
Amazon.com: Motion Pro 08-0409 Spoon Type Tire Iron: Automotive

You won't be able to breake the bead on a street bike tire like it shows in that video...you also need soapy water and paste wax. Usually the 2nd bead of the removal, and the 1st bead of the mounting can be pushed on/off the rim without tools

The biggest challenge is not scratching your rims with the spoons...you can use rim protectors:
Motion Pro 08-0357 Rim Protector : Amazon.com : Automotive

or make your own shields with old soda bottles

4. Then you can usually re-seat the bead with air pressure...if the tire is compressed, get it warm...like over 100 degF and it will soften up...and use a ratchet strap around the circumference

5. Then you have to balance, this can be done at home with a home-made rig, a store-bought rig:
Wheel Balancers


or dyna-beads: Amazon.com: Counteract Tire Balancing Beads - 1 - 1 oz bag, 1 - 2 oz bag/--: Automotive

Your investment will not be paid for in the 1st time you DIY, but you eventually it will as bikes eat through tires, and you can do it on your own time and gain a new skill.
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
Also here is the best tire patch kit I've found:
I have this and it fits in front of your battery
Amazon.com: Stop & Go International Tubeless Tire Plugger with CO2 1001: Automotive


Its better than the sticky "rope" style plugs...and these are a permanent repair...the cool thing is it comes with enough CO2 to fill up a couple of tires...on the road!

I remember one year I got no less than 3 punctures on my bike tire due to nails and crap in the road...everyone should ride with one of these kits.
 

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Cheap balancing.

This method depends on light drag of the wheel bearings and seals, it works well with SV650 wheels but I haven’t tried it with the FZ 09 yet.

Put the axle through the wheel and then across a couple of saw horses so that the wheel can turn freely. I have a couple of small notches in the horses so the axle doesn’t roll, but you don’t need to do that to try it out.

Do this with the unbalanced wheel and it should go back and forth until it settles. Give the wheel a 1/8 or so turn one way and let go, then the other way. It should give you close to the same answer each time (within an inch?), if it doesn’t either the wheel has too much drag for this method or it isn’t out of balance by much.

After you have balanced the wheel you can test the sensitivity of the method. A quarter of the way around the rim from your balance weights tape on a small weight, see how small a weight you can detect.

Of the several OEM weights I have the smallest is 10 grams and they seem to come in 10g increments so I guess 10g is what they consider “close enough”. The self-adhesive strips of weights you can buy are scored in 7g blocks but with a pair of side-cuts you can snip them as you choose. It’s been years but I think I was getting down to about 1 gram resolution, always felt smooth on street and track.

Keep the old weights you take off, when balancing you can temporarily tape them on to see what weight you’ll need from the new adhesive strip.

Remember to balance with the valve stem cap on. ;)



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Another important thing to remember is that the heavy spot of the wheel isn't always at the valve stem area. I like to put my wheel on the balancer that I've got and let the heavy spot rotate to the bottom. I generally will check it a couple of times just to make sure. When that spot finds it's way to the bottom, I usually center-punch the wheel at that spot.....towards the lip of the rim so that I can find it again pretty easily. Now you know where the heavy spot of the wheel is and you can mount your new tire appropriately and then do a final balance adding wheel weights as necessary.
 
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This method depends on light drag of the wheel bearings and seals, it works well with SV650 wheels but I haven’t tried it with the FZ 09 yet.

Put the axle through the wheel and then across a couple of saw horses so that the wheel can turn freely. I have a couple of small notches in the horses so the axle doesn’t roll, but you don’t need to do that to try it out.

Do this with the unbalanced wheel and it should go back and forth until it settles. Give the wheel a 1/8 or so turn one way and let go, then the other way. It should give you close to the same answer each time (within an inch?), if it doesn’t either the wheel has too much drag for this method or it isn’t out of balance by much.

After you have balanced the wheel you can test the sensitivity of the method. A quarter of the way around the rim from your balance weights tape on a small weight, see how small a weight you can detect.

Of the several OEM weights I have the smallest is 10 grams and they seem to come in 10g increments so I guess 10g is what they consider “close enough”. The self-adhesive strips of weights you can buy are scored in 7g blocks but with a pair of side-cuts you can snip them as you choose. It’s been years but I think I was getting down to about 1 gram resolution, always felt smooth on street and track.

Keep the old weights you take off, when balancing you can temporarily tape them on to see what weight you’ll need from the new adhesive strip.

Remember to balance with the valve stem cap on. ;)
I've done static balancing tires before and I finally tried the beads this past riding season. The beads are the way to go imo because of the dynamic balancing they offer. More reliable and in my experience have offered a much better balance across all speeds.

Steve
 

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I've done static balancing tires before and I finally tried the beads this past riding season. The beads are the way to go imo because of the dynamic balancing they offer. ...
The beads in the link above? I see for tubeless tires you put a bag of the beads in as you mount the tire, I guess that means when you start riding the bag quickly breaks so the beads can spread out as needed? And so a new bag every time you change a tire?



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I'm thinking that if the beads really worked well, wouldn't all the AMA, WSB, and MotoGP teams be using them......only the best for those teams! No thanks, I'll stick to my Marc Parnes balancer and a perfect balance by me........everytime.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Ive never used the dyna beads, but I see them at all the trade shows. My understanding is that they are an acceptable solution for the home mechanic, and actually work. Are they better than weights?...well probably messier when its time to take the tire off.
You are supposed to dump the beads in through the valve stem with the core removed.

I like V2Bobs Axle trick...make sure your horses are level.
If you got a good method already, I'd say go with it.

Given all this fuss that one has to go through, its almost no wonder that they charge $75 a pop at the dealership, I heard in NYC its like $120 per tire.
Although, it is nice to be the only one who touches your machine. Heck, I roast my own coffee...why?...cause I do it better!
 

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Thanks Luke, like I said I haven't tried it with the 09 wheels yet, should work, anyone that tries just check that the drag is low enough.

Re the beads, check out your link maybe they changed it since you read it over.

"Simply throw in a bag when mounting a new tubeless tire or used the DIY kit for on the bike and tube type installation"

Seems the bag has to break for it to work. Kind of wonder about sport bikes though, seems every hard acceleration and braking would make the balance funky lol.



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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Thanks Luke, like I said I haven't tried it with the 09 wheels yet, should work, anyone that tries just check that the drag is low enough.

Re the beads, check out your link maybe they changed it since you read it over.

"Simply throw in a bag when mounting a new tubeless tire or used the DIY kit for on the bike and tube type installation"

Seems the bag has to break for it to work. Kind of wonder about sport bikes though, seems every hard acceleration and braking would make the balance funky lol.
I think they are being liberal with the instructions, I think by "throw" they mean pour the beads in using the applicator. It looks like they actually toss an open bag in the tire for larger truck tires, on their website.
Installation
For a streetbike, I would use the applicator. The principle in the function is that the beads can freely move around inside the tire...the bag would get in the way, I'd think.
 

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I think they are being liberal with the instructions, I think by "throw" they mean pour the beads in using the applicator. It looks like they actually toss an open bag in the tire for larger truck tires, on their website.
Installation
For a streetbike, I would use the applicator. The principle in the function is that the beads can freely move around inside the tire...the bag would get in the way, I'd think.
I use beads in the tires on all my bikes. Only because I like the convenience of beads compared to other balancing methods. I've been using them for about three years now without issues. I did notice it appeared as if the last set of tires I put on my harley seemed to be wearing better and longer. I thought it was a coincidence or my imagination (which it may very well be) but it lead me to do some investigation. I did find several articles by tire manufacturers that said (paraphrase)... as a tire wears the balance of the tire changes due to normal wear from use.. thus a tire should be balanced several times throughout its use to increase its useful life span and to provide the best ride possible. They went on to say, Beads provide a 'constant' balanced tire throughout the life of the tire... thus increasing it's life span and continually providing the best ride possible.
Do I 'buy' all that... well it sounds plausible and makes sense. Do I feel like tire beads make my tires ride better... no... but... I must say they appear to wear better and last longer.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Cool...jmc, please clear this up for us...do you use the applicator or toss in the whole bag before mounting the tire?
 

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Cool...jmc, please clear this up for us...do you use the applicator or toss in the whole bag before mounting the tire?
Depending upon the tire size = the amount of beads to use. For the most part mine get 2oz of beads in the rear tire an 1oz in the front. I buy my ceramic beads from ebay in a 5oz bag. I weight them on my gun power scale to get the proper amount measured out. I have a clear piece of tubing that fits over the tire valve, the hose is about 8" in length. I mount my own rubber so after the tire seals I remove the valve stem letting the air out of the tire, then slide the clear tubing over the valve (stem removed) and using a small homemade funnel I pour the beads down the valve. Occasionally the beads will bunch up if you pour them too fast. At this point you can 'flick' the tubing with your finger or using a blow off adapter on your compressor blow a little air down the tubing to force the beads into the tire. Pretty simple.
I got that trick from;
 

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Just saw this thread for the first time today and I had to add my 2 cents worth. I've used the Dyna beads for the last 6 years in my FJR tires and they are great. I've been on trips or should I say zips at 135 MPH and the bike was rock steady like it was on a rail and very smooth. The wear on the tires has been more even than before the beads. When I pull off a set of tires I first take a 5/8" drill bit and drill a hole in the tire and dump the beads into a pan to recycle them. After the tire was off the rim, I checked the inside and there was no sign of wear on the rim or the tire. They can be a bit of a pain to feed through the valve stem, but if you use a blow gun with the little pointed rubber end, you can fill the filler tube with beads and then hit it with a shot of air to quickly inject the beads into the tire (of course after the side walls are seated). I would not toss the beads in still in the bag. If you don't want to mess with recycling the beads you can always buy another 3 oz faily cheap. For the FZ you would run the same amount of beads as the FJR (same tire sizes), 1 oz in the front and 2 oz in the rear. The first time I used the beads, the guy at the local Honda shop didn't was to use them, so I told him fine, don't balance the tires after put them on. I took a slow paced ride home and injected the beads in myself.
I am definitely sold on them. If you do your own tire swapping, they are a great way to go. Another plus is, they don't look like an afterthought stuck on the outside of the rim, and they will not sling off down the road somewhere.
 

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The flat tire kit looks great luke, I may get one for Xmas.
Do you carry pliers with the kit? to remove any of those foreign objects?
 
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