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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Coach, I have a crimp! Oops, wrong forum.

For my turn signal project I have these terminals to crimp on to the R&G wires. I haven’t done this kind of crimping before, what tool do I need and how? If I take the terminal to Radio Shack will they have the right tool? If you have a link to the right tool please paste it.



In the photo you can see triangular tabs and rectangular ones, I assume the triangles grip the wire’s insulation and the rectangles crimp onto the bare wire.

About my signal project, here is what I have:
R&G LED micro indicators, front and rear (I'll use the orange lens that come with them).
Flexible slip-on loom from McMaster-Carr
OEM compatible connectors, colored for left and right. To meet the minimum order I got twice as many as needed, plus a pack of extra terminals in case I screw up the crimping.
Not shown: a blinker relay that replaces the stock one and works with the LEDs.



 

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Bob, you are correct, the triangle pieces are to fold over and tighten against the insulation on the wire and the rectangle area is for folding over and making contact with the bare wire. I've not used that type before but in looking at them, it seems that maybe a pair of needle nose pliers would do the job "folding" the tabs over. If you have a soldering iron/gun/pencil, I would solder the connections after you fold them over, then put heat shrink over the top of them if you have it and a way to shrink it on.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Thanks Vern, maybe I should have should have put a tape measure by the terminals, they are tiny, 17mm long. They will be completely inside the plastic pieces, so no need for the heat shrink, nor the room.

I have extra terminals, could experiment with needle nose, but aren't there tools made for it? I'd like to get the tool if it isn't crazy expensive.
 

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Here you go. You need something like this. The top part of the connector get crimp over the insulation. Different connector here but you get tue idea...





Sent from my SAMSUNG-SGH-I337 using Tapatalk
 

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Honestly Bob, I don't know. I've never used that type of connector before. Here is an ebay link to the type that I have. They are made to work on Sta-kon connectors, which is what I've used for many years at work.

Again, I would solder the connection if possible

Thomas Betts WT111M Sta Kon Electrical Crimping and Cutting Tool | eBay
You should never solder terminal on wires. If the terminal is crimp properly it will never come out. I DNF a race once because of that... make the wire weak where it heat up and break with vibration. The best terminal (marine grade) have heatshrink insulation on them... those are really good!
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OH!

I’ve had this tool for ages for stripping wires. But obviously owning a tool does not equal having a clue what all can be done with it.



So this how you crimp with it? That is with the tool on the rectangular tabs, the triangles are closer to the camera. I see Marthy’s crimper is shaped to curl the tabs in for a better bite. I guess the tool I have will work, I might see if Radio shack has one that is better for small work and doing the Marthy curl.



Thanks everyone.
 

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You should never solder terminal on wires. If the terminal is crimp properly it will never come out. I DNF a race once because of that... make the wire weak where it heat up and break with vibration. The best terminal (marine grade) have heatshrink insulation on them... those are really good!
Sorry to disagree with you Marthy, but soldering a connection like that will not weaken it in the least. It is done all the time in manufacturing environments. The trick to making any connection last for a long time is to make a very secure connection, which soldering does, and to minimize the amount of vibration that the connection sees. I'm not saying that you can't OVER-HEAT a solder joint and get it a lot hotter than you need to, but if done properly, it will not ever be an issue.
 

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The OEM connectors are not soldered. Personally, I think soldering is a little overboard for this application, but certainly wont hurt anything to do so.



No solder here...

 

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As I stated in the other thread about why manufacturers don't solder connections.........it takes too long and would drive up the price of the motorcycle because of increased time to build and the added step of soldering.
 

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Even at top level of motorsports where people don't solder anything anymore, everything is crimp. Believe me... $ is not an issue in racing. If it was better they would solder the whole car together. LOL

Solding 2 wires together is one thibg but end terminal is not in your best interest.

If you never has issues doing so, keep doing it. But one of the many things I learn from working on racecars for over 20 years is... don't solder terminals, crimp them properly with the right tool.

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Dsmn Bob, I have that exact same stripper, and have for 20 years. Great minds think alike, but Marthy trumped us with his fancy pants stripper. I use the tip of my wife's tiny jewelers needle nose pliers to slightly curl over the prongs before I press them down.
 

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Dsmn Bob, I have that exact same stripper, and have for 20 years. Great minds think alike, but Marthy trumped us with his fancy pants stripper. I use the tip of my wife's tiny jewelers needle nose pliers to slightly curl over the prongs before I press them down.
Doug, you are on the verge of having your "man card" revoked for admitting to that! Shame..Shame!
 

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If it ain't soldered it's just a temporary connection.

Not to disagree with anyone's experiences. However, if you ever perform a reliability/MTBF failure analysis on a electromechanical system, (car/motorcycle etc.) the lowest reliability items are connectors. Hence in military application (it had better work or many people will get killed situations) careful consideration are made to positive screw-locking connectors. If anybody has had more failures with soldered connections I would bet it has to do with the quality of the soldering and not the fact it was soldered.
 

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Marthy is correct. Solder makes the joint, where wire and connector are soldered brittle and vibration WILL break it at the solder.
I spent 30 years in Aerospace mfg and we do a LOT of vibe testing.... crimps are more durable.

These guys sell a crimper for your need, I have one and it works great.....

OEM-Type Bullet & Spade Electrical Connectors for 1960's through 1970's Japanese Vehicles... Bridgestone, Datsun, Hodaka, Honda, Kawasaki, Landcruiser, Suzuki, Tohatsu, VW, & Yamaha
Click on tools.....

You should never solder terminal on wires. If the terminal is crimp properly it will never come out. I DNF a race once because of that... make the wire weak where it heat up and break with vibration. The best terminal (marine grade) have heatshrink insulation on them... those are really good!
 
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I spent 30 years in Aerospca mfg QC... you are wrong. When exposed to vibration (we do a LOT of Vibe testing) the wire will break at the solder joint.
Crimps don't have that problem, they last a lot longer than a solder joint.



Sorry to disagree with you Marthy, but soldering a connection like that will not weaken it in the least. It is done all the time in manufacturing environments. The trick to making any connection last for a long time is to make a very secure connection, which soldering does, and to minimize the amount of vibration that the connection sees. I'm not saying that you can't OVER-HEAT a solder joint and get it a lot hotter than you need to, but if done properly, it will not ever be an issue.
 

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I guess we'll just have to agree to disagree then, as my 34 years of a Journeyman Industrial Electrician doesn't show that to be true.
 
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