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This is a write up/instructions for converting the FZ to a G.P. shift pattern, which is exactly opposite of the standard shift pattern. Normal shift pattern is.... 1 down, and 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 up. The G.P. shift pattern reverses this and is
1 Up, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 down. My reason for doing this is so the FZ shift pattern matches the shift pattern on my track bike. Going from one shift pattern to the other gets kind of confusing if one bike is Standard shift and the other bike is G.P. shift....too easy to make shifting errors either on the street or on the track. The biggest advantage to this is that you "tap" down to upshift and this can be done a lot easier and safer if you have the bike leaned over a bit in a corner......without fear of having your boot under the shifter and possibly catching your toe while shifting.

So, here is the Instruction on the steps involved and the parts needed to convert to G.P. shift. If you have any questions, please feel free to PM me and I will do my best to answer any and all questions regarding the installation of the parts or procedure itself.

GP Shift Conversion for Yamaha FZ 09
Parts List: 1. 6mm Female Rod End (Heim) w/ Left Hand Thread
Part Number: PHS6L… Female Rod End 6mm PHS6L Left hand Ball Bearings
2. Two 6mm Allen head bolts….standard thread…not left handed, approx 25mm in length. If you
have to buy a longer one, you can always carefully cut it off to the correct length.
3. One 6mm self locking nut, standard thread….not left handed
4. What ever you choose to use for shimming out the upper heim from the shifter arm…..approx.
½ inch distance.

Step 1: Place bike on stands if available and take a measurement from the center of the existing foot shifter down to the floor, in order to get the same shifter height adjustment on completion of the GP shift conversion.

Step 2: Loosen and remove the bolt from the shift arm that is attached to the shifting shaft of the bike. This will allow the arm, shift linkage, and shift lever to drop down to an accessible area without a need to remove the left foot peg.

Step 3: Center-punch the riveted pin that holds the lower heim to the shift lever. Try to be as close to the center of the pin as possible. Start out drilling with a 3/32” drill bit and drill approx. 5/8” deep. Change the bit to a 3/16” size and re-drill the same hole. Change the bit again and drill a 5/16” hole in the pin.
A word of caution…..if you have got the drill hole off center and are going to end up drilling the existing hole in the shift lever, reduce the drill bit sizes accordingly to keep this from happening

Step 4: After completing the drilling of the pin, you can now take a pair of vice grips and turn the pin back and forth and work it out. If it doesn’t want to come out, take a Dremel with a small tip and very carefully grind the area of the pin that is flared out from being riveted into the shift lever. After carefully removing this “lip”, the pin should come out very easily.

Step 5: With the pin removed, you are now ready to take a file to the flat, backside of the shift lever. If you notice, the flat area of the lever, where the pin was previously located, has a curved section at the top of it that will interfere with the new lower heim being mounted flush with the flat plate. File this area until the flat section is perfectly flat and no more curved area directly above the flat plate.

Step 6: The heim that I purchased also needed to be filed a bit. There was a flat area on the heim, where the shift linkage screws into it. I basically extended the length of the flat area by filing it also. If you have a Dremel tool, it will certainly be faster than using a file. It didn’t take much, maybe an additional 5/16 to 3/8” of additional flat area. This will keep the heim from binding against the shift lever. With this accomplished, it is now time to mount the new 6mm, left hand thread heim to the shift lever, using a 6mm bolt, a self locking 6mm nut and a flat washer on the side next to the nut. Insert the 6mm bolt (approx. 25 to 27mm in length) into the shift lever. Then place the heim on the engine side of the shift lever, add the flat washer, and finally the 6mm self locking nut and tighten sufficiently. Lacking a 6mm self locking nut, I suppose you could use a regular 6mm nut and some locktite….or drill it and safety wire the nut on.

Step 7: Remove the upper heim from the shifter arm and set aside for re-use. You will need to place the shifter arm that attaches to the shift shaft, in a bench vise. The part of the arm that is the attachment point for the upper heim, needs to be very slightly bent outward. Careful here, as not much bend is needed. With the shifter arm secured in a vise, very carefully use a crescent wrench and adjust it to the thickness of the arm and bend slightly outward. I’m talking a very small amount, so go easy on this step. It’s better to bend a little and try it and if it’s not enough, bend a bit more.

Step 8: Reattach the upper heim to the shifter arm and use the longer 6mm screw that you bought. You will need to shim the heim out away from the shift arm by approx. 7/16th to ½ inch. Make sure to use locktite on the end of the screw to keep it from backing out. Now, screw the whole unit into the lower heim. Remember, the lower heim is a left hand thread, so the Righty tighty thing is reversed! Try to screw an equal amount of thread from the linkage into the upper and the lower heim so that you are basically in the middle of the adjustment range of the linkage.

Step 9: Now place the shifter arm on the shift shaft, only this time, instead of the arm being in the forward direction, it will be pointing towards the rear of the bike. Referencing the original measurement that you took of the height of the shift lever toe piece from the floor and place the shifter arm on the shaft so that you are approx. in the same location as far as the height of the shift lever from the floor. At this point, you will need to remove the counter-shaft sprocket cover in order to get the bolt in the shifter arm, since it now comes into the arm from the bottom. There are three screws that hold the sprocket cover on and when they are removed, the cover comes off, allowing room for the screw to go in the shifter arm. Make sure that you get your height adjustment as close as you can to the original height before tightening the screw in the shifter arm, then replace the sprocket cover. A final adjustment can now be made with the linkage by screwing it either clockwise or counter-clockwise to raise or lower the shift lever to the correct position.


Pictures added of the finished product.....





Picture of the shifter arm turned "backwards" which causes the reverse shift pattern to work...
 

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Pictures added to the original post...
 
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Vern, thanks for all of the hard work that you put into that. I have always wanted to switch to a GP shift pattern. Makes total sense to me. This may very well be the bike that I take the plunge. I should have done it thirty years ago on my RD's when I had the chance. Motocross prevented me from doing it.
 

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Nice work Vern! I have the same issue as you with all the other bikes being gp shift so I was a bit bummed to see that just swapping the shifter arm didn't provide enough clearance for the shaft around the rearset mount. I'm sure I'll be swapping out the rearsets to an adjustable setup once they start becoming available so I took a much simpler approach to getting gp shift on the stock setup: bend the rod! I had a spare FZ1 rod lying around so after a few measurements and a little bending, it's all good. Doesn't look quite as factory as all the work you put into yours but the result is the same and it works fine. First big ride will be in a couple weeks at Sonoma. Can't wait!

--David

fz09_gp.jpg
 

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David....you made it work, that's what counts....you can always do the conversion that I did when you get time. The issue that I see for the aftermarket companies making rearsets for this bike is the fact that one of the mounting points of the existing footpegs is the swingarm bolt is used....that would be a bitch to swap out without a lot of work.
 

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Yep. It's gonna be a bitch to swap out for sure. Won't be able to prop the bike up on jack stands using the pegs. Might actually have to use straps to get tension off the shock! I haven't used straps to hang a bike in years...
 

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Me neither....circa..2001 for me
 

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This is a write up/instructions for converting the FZ to a G.P. shift pattern, which is exactly opposite of the standard shift pattern. Normal shift pattern is.... 1 down, and 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 up. The G.P. shift pattern reverses this and is
1 Up, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 down. My reason for doing this is so the FZ shift pattern matches the shift pattern on my track bike. Going from one shift pattern to the other gets kind of confusing if one bike is Standard shift and the other bike is G.P. shift....too easy to make shifting errors either on the street or on the track. The biggest advantage to this is that you "tap" down to upshift and this can be done a lot easier and safer if you have the bike leaned over a bit in a corner......without fear of having your boot under the shifter and possibly catching your toe while shifting.

So, here is the Instruction on the steps involved and the parts needed to convert to G.P. shift. If you have any questions, please feel free to PM me and I will do my best to answer any and all questions regarding the installation of the parts or procedure itself.

GP Shift Conversion for Yamaha FZ 09
Parts List: 1. 6mm Female Rod End (Heim) w/ Left Hand Thread
Part Number: PHS6L… Female Rod End 6mm PHS6L Left hand Ball Bearings
2. Two 6mm Allen head bolts….standard thread…not left handed, approx 25mm in length. If you
have to buy a longer one, you can always carefully cut it off to the correct length.
3. One 6mm self locking nut, standard thread….not left handed
4. What ever you choose to use for shimming out the upper heim from the shifter arm…..approx.
½ inch distance.

Step 1: Place bike on stands if available and take a measurement from the center of the existing foot shifter down to the floor, in order to get the same shifter height adjustment on completion of the GP shift conversion.

Step 2: Loosen and remove the bolt from the shift arm that is attached to the shifting shaft of the bike. This will allow the arm, shift linkage, and shift lever to drop down to an accessible area without a need to remove the left foot peg.

Step 3: Center-punch the riveted pin that holds the lower heim to the shift lever. Try to be as close to the center of the pin as possible. Start out drilling with a 3/32” drill bit and drill approx. 5/8” deep. Change the bit to a 3/16” size and re-drill the same hole. Change the bit again and drill a 5/16” hole in the pin.
A word of caution…..if you have got the drill hole off center and are going to end up drilling the existing hole in the shift lever, reduce the drill bit sizes accordingly to keep this from happening

Step 4: After completing the drilling of the pin, you can now take a pair of vice grips and turn the pin back and forth and work it out. If it doesn’t want to come out, take a Dremel with a small tip and very carefully grind the area of the pin that is flared out from being riveted into the shift lever. After carefully removing this “lip”, the pin should come out very easily.

Step 5: With the pin removed, you are now ready to take a file to the flat, backside of the shift lever. If you notice, the flat area of the lever, where the pin was previously located, has a curved section at the top of it that will interfere with the new lower heim being mounted flush with the flat plate. File this area until the flat section is perfectly flat and no more curved area directly above the flat plate.

Step 6: The heim that I purchased also needed to be filed a bit. There was a flat area on the heim, where the shift linkage screws into it. I basically extended the length of the flat area by filing it also. If you have a Dremel tool, it will certainly be faster than using a file. It didn’t take much, maybe an additional 5/16 to 3/8” of additional flat area. This will keep the heim from binding against the shift lever. With this accomplished, it is now time to mount the new 6mm, left hand thread heim to the shift lever, using a 6mm bolt, a self locking 6mm nut and a flat washer on the side next to the nut. Insert the 6mm bolt (approx. 25 to 27mm in length) into the shift lever. Then place the heim on the engine side of the shift lever, add the flat washer, and finally the 6mm self locking nut and tighten sufficiently. Lacking a 6mm self locking nut, I suppose you could use a regular 6mm nut and some locktite….or drill it and safety wire the nut on.

Step 7: Remove the upper heim from the shifter arm and set aside for re-use. You will need to place the shifter arm that attaches to the shift shaft, in a bench vise. The part of the arm that is the attachment point for the upper heim, needs to be very slightly bent outward. Careful here, as not much bend is needed. With the shifter arm secured in a vise, very carefully use a crescent wrench and adjust it to the thickness of the arm and bend slightly outward. I’m talking a very small amount, so go easy on this step. It’s better to bend a little and try it and if it’s not enough, bend a bit more.

Step 8: Reattach the upper heim to the shifter arm and use the longer 6mm screw that you bought. You will need to shim the heim out away from the shift arm by approx. 7/16th to ½ inch. Make sure to use locktite on the end of the screw to keep it from backing out. Now, screw the whole unit into the lower heim. Remember, the lower heim is a left hand thread, so the Righty tighty thing is reversed! Try to screw an equal amount of thread from the linkage into the upper and the lower heim so that you are basically in the middle of the adjustment range of the linkage.

Step 9: Now place the shifter arm on the shift shaft, only this time, instead of the arm being in the forward direction, it will be pointing towards the rear of the bike. Referencing the original measurement that you took of the height of the shift lever toe piece from the floor and place the shifter arm on the shaft so that you are approx. in the same location as far as the height of the shift lever from the floor. At this point, you will need to remove the counter-shaft sprocket cover in order to get the bolt in the shifter arm, since it now comes into the arm from the bottom. There are three screws that hold the sprocket cover on and when they are removed, the cover comes off, allowing room for the screw to go in the shifter arm. Make sure that you get your height adjustment as close as you can to the original height before tightening the screw in the shifter arm, then replace the sprocket cover. A final adjustment can now be made with the linkage by screwing it either clockwise or counter-clockwise to raise or lower the shift lever to the correct position.


Pictures added of the finished product.....





Picture of the shifter arm turned "backwards" which causes the reverse shift pattern to work...
Nice re-work !
 

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Yep. It's gonna be a bitch to swap out for sure. Won't be able to prop the bike up on jack stands using the pegs. Might actually have to use straps to get tension off the shock! I haven't used straps to hang a bike in years...
Convenient tree, rope, and come-along...it's what I have, hah hah !
 

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This is a write up/instructions for converting the FZ to a G.P. shift pattern, which is exactly opposite of the standard shift pattern. Normal shift pattern is.... 1 down, and 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 up. The G.P. shift pattern reverses this and is
1 Up, 2, 3, 4, 5, and 6 down. My reason for doing this is so the FZ shift pattern matches the shift pattern on my track bike. Going from one shift pattern to the other gets kind of confusing if one bike is Standard shift and the other bike is G.P. shift....too easy to make shifting errors either on the street or on the track. The biggest advantage to this is that you "tap" down to upshift and this can be done a lot easier and safer if you have the bike leaned over a bit in a corner......without fear of having your boot under the shifter and possibly catching your toe while shifting.

So, here is the Instruction on the steps involved and the parts needed to convert to G.P. shift. If you have any questions, please feel free to PM me and I will do my best to answer any and all questions regarding the installation of the parts or procedure itself.

GP Shift Conversion for Yamaha FZ 09
Parts List: 1. 6mm Female Rod End (Heim) w/ Left Hand Thread
Part Number: PHS6L… Female Rod End 6mm PHS6L Left hand Ball Bearings
2. Two 6mm Allen head bolts….standard thread…not left handed, approx 25mm in length. If you
have to buy a longer one, you can always carefully cut it off to the correct length.
3. One 6mm self locking nut, standard thread….not left handed
4. What ever you choose to use for shimming out the upper heim from the shifter arm…..approx.
½ inch distance.

Step 1: Place bike on stands if available and take a measurement from the center of the existing foot shifter down to the floor, in order to get the same shifter height adjustment on completion of the GP shift conversion.

Step 2: Loosen and remove the bolt from the shift arm that is attached to the shifting shaft of the bike. This will allow the arm, shift linkage, and shift lever to drop down to an accessible area without a need to remove the left foot peg.

Step 3: Center-punch the riveted pin that holds the lower heim to the shift lever. Try to be as close to the center of the pin as possible. Start out drilling with a 3/32” drill bit and drill approx. 5/8” deep. Change the bit to a 3/16” size and re-drill the same hole. Change the bit again and drill a 5/16” hole in the pin.
A word of caution…..if you have got the drill hole off center and are going to end up drilling the existing hole in the shift lever, reduce the drill bit sizes accordingly to keep this from happening

Step 4: After completing the drilling of the pin, you can now take a pair of vice grips and turn the pin back and forth and work it out. If it doesn’t want to come out, take a Dremel with a small tip and very carefully grind the area of the pin that is flared out from being riveted into the shift lever. After carefully removing this “lip”, the pin should come out very easily.

Step 5: With the pin removed, you are now ready to take a file to the flat, backside of the shift lever. If you notice, the flat area of the lever, where the pin was previously located, has a curved section at the top of it that will interfere with the new lower heim being mounted flush with the flat plate. File this area until the flat section is perfectly flat and no more curved area directly above the flat plate.

Step 6: The heim that I purchased also needed to be filed a bit. There was a flat area on the heim, where the shift linkage screws into it. I basically extended the length of the flat area by filing it also. If you have a Dremel tool, it will certainly be faster than using a file. It didn’t take much, maybe an additional 5/16 to 3/8” of additional flat area. This will keep the heim from binding against the shift lever. With this accomplished, it is now time to mount the new 6mm, left hand thread heim to the shift lever, using a 6mm bolt, a self locking 6mm nut and a flat washer on the side next to the nut. Insert the 6mm bolt (approx. 25 to 27mm in length) into the shift lever. Then place the heim on the engine side of the shift lever, add the flat washer, and finally the 6mm self locking nut and tighten sufficiently. Lacking a 6mm self locking nut, I suppose you could use a regular 6mm nut and some locktite….or drill it and safety wire the nut on.

Step 7: Remove the upper heim from the shifter arm and set aside for re-use. You will need to place the shifter arm that attaches to the shift shaft, in a bench vise. The part of the arm that is the attachment point for the upper heim, needs to be very slightly bent outward. Careful here, as not much bend is needed. With the shifter arm secured in a vise, very carefully use a crescent wrench and adjust it to the thickness of the arm and bend slightly outward. I’m talking a very small amount, so go easy on this step. It’s better to bend a little and try it and if it’s not enough, bend a bit more.

Step 8: Reattach the upper heim to the shifter arm and use the longer 6mm screw that you bought. You will need to shim the heim out away from the shift arm by approx. 7/16th to ½ inch. Make sure to use locktite on the end of the screw to keep it from backing out. Now, screw the whole unit into the lower heim. Remember, the lower heim is a left hand thread, so the Righty tighty thing is reversed! Try to screw an equal amount of thread from the linkage into the upper and the lower heim so that you are basically in the middle of the adjustment range of the linkage.

Step 9: Now place the shifter arm on the shift shaft, only this time, instead of the arm being in the forward direction, it will be pointing towards the rear of the bike. Referencing the original measurement that you took of the height of the shift lever toe piece from the floor and place the shifter arm on the shaft so that you are approx. in the same location as far as the height of the shift lever from the floor. At this point, you will need to remove the counter-shaft sprocket cover in order to get the bolt in the shifter arm, since it now comes into the arm from the bottom. There are three screws that hold the sprocket cover on and when they are removed, the cover comes off, allowing room for the screw to go in the shifter arm. Make sure that you get your height adjustment as close as you can to the original height before tightening the screw in the shifter arm, then replace the sprocket cover. A final adjustment can now be made with the linkage by screwing it either clockwise or counter-clockwise to raise or lower the shift lever to the correct position.


Pictures added of the finished product.....





Picture of the shifter arm turned "backwards" which causes the reverse shift pattern to work...
Triple: thanks a lot for this write up!

Does anyone know if any company/ies are making a rod which can simply be bolted on, with an adjusted angle?
 

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There are none that I know of. Having said that, I really haven't searched for anything like that because of my mod working so well. I suspect the only other option would be to install an aftermarket set of rearsets, and that would be more work that making the changes that I made if all you are after is the G.P. shift pattern. If however, you are also looking to raise the footpegs and move them back a bit, then the aftermarket rearsets are the way to go.

Thanks for the compliment on the mod job that I did. I'm guessing that I was probably the very first one to do it, as it was done shortly after I bought the bike in Oct. 2013
 
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There are none that I know of. Having said that, I really haven't searched for anything like that because of my mod working so well. I suspect the only other option would be to install an aftermarket set of rearsets, and that would be more work that making the changes that I made if all you are after is the G.P. shift pattern. If however, you are also looking to raise the footpegs and move them back a bit, then the aftermarket rearsets are the way to go.

Thanks for the compliment on the mod job that I did. I'm guessing that I was probably the very first one to do it, as it was done shortly after I bought the bike in Oct. 2013
Yeah, man. You did an awesome job, I just wish it wasn't such a handful of work. I remember for my older R6's, as well as my Buell XB, it was a real simple flip of the elbow/arm mount, and I think the R6's required a longer or different shaped rod. I just wish an aftermarket vendor made a threaded rod, bent accordingly, in order to simply flip the elbow and make the GP shift pattern.
 

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That seems like a lot of work, I converted mine to GP before I ever rode it, not even a test ride, haha!

See where you have the credit card? I notched that and flipped the shifter arm, and that was it. Trying to find an old picture, because I changed restarts soon thereafter also.
 

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That seems like a lot of work, I converted mine to GP before I ever rode it, not even a test ride, haha!

See where you have the credit card? I notched that and flipped the shifter arm, and that was it. Trying to find an old picture, because I changed restarts soon thereafter also.
Much simpler! I'm planning on doing this as well. I found a good thread that explains the procedure here...

http://www.fz09.org/forum/14-fz-09-performance-suspension/1769-reverse-shift-mod-different-approach.html
 

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I thought of that BEFORE I decided to do the modification that I did. I just didn't want to cut into the piece that you did and possibly affect structural integrity. I'm probably a bit anal that way, but to me, the best option was the way I did it. Obviously, there were no aftermarket rearsets at the time.....and even if there were, my mod was a lot less expensive than rearsets. To each their own I guess.
 
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I agree, not many of us around. I actually hated my name when I was a kid. From grade school all the way through high school.....no one else named Vern. I finally gave up on caring about it. Anyway, welcome to the forum Vern!
 
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