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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I bought new springs for the forks from sonic springs, but I chose the wrong weighted oil, the rebound and compression of the front fork is still pretty sub par. I had a local shop do the spring and oil change.

Is changing the fork oil on our forks an easy task? Some other bikes I see are basically undo the fork cap and turn it over.

Also, as a 220lb gear weighted rider, what would you guys recommend in oil weight? Sonic Springs told me 7.5w and it doesnt seem two work that well.
 

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I think a lot of riders here have gone with 10 wt oil, but another factor is that different fork oil brands with the same wt number will perform differently.
 

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It's not that simple. You have to have a tool to compress the fork spring, or make one in order to remove the cap and the spring. Then you have to pump the rod, sans spring, upside down to get all of the old oil out. Next, you will need a measuring device to suck out the oil to a certain height from the top while lightly clamping the fork in a level position, etc....
 

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I'm 230 and was riding on .95 springs and 7.5 Motul oil(a blend of 10 and 5wt). I could still bottom it out under braking or landing a semi harsh wheelie, but was quite a bit better than stock.

If changing oil you only need to do it on the side with adjustment. As Doug said it is not as easy as dump-n-fill. Take the 1 leg into the shop, they will make quick work of it.
 

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That is a good question for me too. I come from old school and this is my first bike with upside downers. I remember what I know from back then and while I am sure that I could do these, I will send them to Stoltec for his expertise for the work. It seems just an oil change is as intensive as rebuilding the whole system.
Not to say to do that at your point in the game. But still I would take it to a bike shop for an oil change.
 

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It's definitely not like the old days, but it is something that can be done without spending a lot on special tools. There was a "how-to" posted in another section. I made the spring compressor out of a 2x4 and essentially fixed one end under my workbench and pushed down on the other end to compress the fork springs enough to get a spring holder in place (I used thick plastic). Then you can loosen the lock nut and remove the cap, use the spring compressor to compress the spring and remove the holder and slowly release the tension on the spring. First leg was more difficult, second went faster. I was careful not to get anything inside the left leg so only had to top off the oil a bit to get it to the right level. You can measure the oil level using a zip tie as a dipstick.
 

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It's definitely not like the old days, but it is something that can be done without spending a lot on special tools. There was a "how-to" posted in another section. I made the spring compressor out of a 2x4 and essentially fixed one end under my workbench and pushed down on the other end to compress the fork springs enough to get a spring holder in place (I used thick plastic). Then you can loosen the lock nut and remove the cap, use the spring compressor to compress the spring and remove the holder and slowly release the tension on the spring. First leg was more difficult, second went faster. I was careful not to get anything inside the left leg so only had to top off the oil a bit to get it to the right level. You can measure the oil level using a zip tie as a dipstick.
Thanks. I had previously briefed the take down procedure on the threads here a while back, but quickly lost interest. Old dog new tricks. It is something that I will ultimately learn, I realize.
 
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