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I recently rode a Ryker, incidentally at the same place hosting a Demo Day where I rode the Niken. As someone who had previously never ridden anything three-wheeled before that day, my immediate impressions on the Ryker were:

- Steering is WAY too sensitive. It is impossible to drive in a straight line on this; twitching the handlebar even a millimetre results in turning that direction.
- Acceleration is pretty poor and the CVT does nothing to help the sensation. If you've ever ridden a Seadoo Spark, this feels exactly like that but on the road (as it should, since they share the same engine). You twist the throttle and... ok, so the motor's spinning, now... eventually... ah, now it's starting to accelerate. Even when it's in the powerband, it still feels much slower to move than its 77 hp/616 lb (dry) power-to-weight ratio would suggest.
- It's incredibly sparse. There are no toys here: you get three wheels, a motor, and that's about it. The LCD instrument cluster looks like it came from 2004 and displays about the same information you'd have found then. The rubbery seat, while comfortable, could have been plucked right off the aforementioned PWC. All the bodywork is plastic (which I don't mind as it lends itself well to customization). But the overall effect is of a very cheaply-made machine.
- Front and rear brakes are linked which means there's only one brake control (right foot), and the CVT means there's no clutch or shift lever. So there are only two controls: twist throttle and press brake. I've ridden automatic bikes before. This feels a lot less involved than that. A semi-auto shift option would do wonders for this trike.
- Ride is pretty harsh and thanks to the foot-forward ergo you can't easily lift off the seat.
- I thought braking ought to have been better for having an extra front wheel, and wider wheels at that. Lack of control over which brakes you're activating might have something to do with the perception of braking ability.

I had a couple other thoughts that weren't limited to the Ryker but about all three-wheelers of this type:
- Steering is like a car. It may have handlebars but you don't push/pull the same way as on a bike. I almost think a steering wheel would be better than handlebars on this thing.
- On a similar note you lean the opposite way in turns - not by choice but because you can do nothing else besides hang on as the trike tries to throw you off through every corner.

Those things would just take getting used to but I think my brief experience was enough to keep me well away from this type of trike.

I say "this type of trike" because by contrast, the Niken feels just like a traditional motorcycle. It's a little heavier in the front, can't lean quite as much, and sits you wider than I believe necessary but in every other aspect it's near indistinguishable to ride. I just wish Yamaha hadn't detuned the beautiful CP3 for this application.

I will say I love how the Ryker looks, which is more than I can say about the Niken. I just wish anything else about it at all could justify the price - not for me, but to introduce bike-averse people to three-wheelers and hopefully, eventually two-wheeled motorcycles.

And on that note, one last fun fact: this Demo Day was the exact moment that the one Can-Am Spyder rider I know decided to switch to two wheels. He tried the Niken as well, but rode and subsequently ended up buying a Tracer 900 GT.
 

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^^
Rykers have a CVT but Spyders have a semi automatic transmission with "paddle shifters" (they're almost push buttons :p).
Spyders also come with a much better display console (LT versions) and a powerful 1300cc engine but of course, they're quite heavier compared to Rykers.
I agree with you on the handling and acceleration part but it's a different kinda fun, more leisurely I'd say.
 

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CVT's are the devils trans. Bought by people who hate riding/driving. Except for scooters - maybe.
 

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I recently rode a Ryker, incidentally at the same place hosting a Demo Day where I rode the Niken. As someone who had previously never ridden anything three-wheeled before that day, my immediate impressions on the Ryker were:

- Steering is WAY too sensitive. It is impossible to drive in a straight line on this; twitching the handlebar even a millimetre results in turning that direction.
- Acceleration is pretty poor and the CVT does nothing to help the sensation. If you've ever ridden a Seadoo Spark, this feels exactly like that but on the road (as it should, since they share the same engine). You twist the throttle and... ok, so the motor's spinning, now... eventually... ah, now it's starting to accelerate. Even when it's in the powerband, it still feels much slower to move than its 77 hp/616 lb (dry) power-to-weight ratio would suggest.
- It's incredibly sparse. There are no toys here: you get three wheels, a motor, and that's about it. The LCD instrument cluster looks like it came from 2004 and displays about the same information you'd have found then. The rubbery seat, while comfortable, could have been plucked right off the aforementioned PWC. All the bodywork is plastic (which I don't mind as it lends itself well to customization). But the overall effect is of a very cheaply-made machine.
- Front and rear brakes are linked which means there's only one brake control (right foot), and the CVT means there's no clutch or shift lever. So there are only two controls: twist throttle and press brake. I've ridden automatic bikes before. This feels a lot less involved than that. A semi-auto shift option would do wonders for this trike.
- Ride is pretty harsh and thanks to the foot-forward ergo you can't easily lift off the seat.
- I thought braking ought to have been better for having an extra front wheel, and wider wheels at that. Lack of control over which brakes you're activating might have something to do with the perception of braking ability.

I had a couple other thoughts that weren't limited to the Ryker but about all three-wheelers of this type:
- Steering is like a car. It may have handlebars but you don't push/pull the same way as on a bike. I almost think a steering wheel would be better than handlebars on this thing.
- On a similar note you lean the opposite way in turns - not by choice but because you can do nothing else besides hang on as the trike tries to throw you off through every corner.

Those things would just take getting used to but I think my brief experience was enough to keep me well away from this type of trike.

I say "this type of trike" because by contrast, the Niken feels just like a traditional motorcycle. It's a little heavier in the front, can't lean quite as much, and sits you wider than I believe necessary but in every other aspect it's near indistinguishable to ride. I just wish Yamaha hadn't detuned the beautiful CP3 for this application.

I will say I love how the Ryker looks, which is more than I can say about the Niken. I just wish anything else about it at all could justify the price - not for me, but to introduce bike-averse people to three-wheelers and hopefully, eventually two-wheeled motorcycles.

And on that note, one last fun fact: this Demo Day was the exact moment that the one Can-Am Spyder rider I know decided to switch to two wheels. He tried the Niken as well, but rode and subsequently ended up buying a Tracer 900 GT.
I rode the a Ryker at a demo event recently also. This review is pretty much spot on for how I felt. The only thing I would add...... is it feels like an slightly oversized go-cart, and I would not feel comfortable on the freeway with other cars all around me. Feels like a toy, not a real mode of transportation. Hi-way speeds with other traffic around...no thanks!
 

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Discussion Starter #26
Well ... I checked out Spyders a bit more the past few weeks. I rode a few models and really became quite smitten with the F3-S model in black/black. When I was at the dealership, they asked if I would get a trade assessment, so I said WTH. As usual, they were about $1k off (actually $500sh). I said get it up $1k and I'd do it. They came up $750 + ,discounted the Spyder $1200, so I pulled the trigger. My Triumph 800 Tiger XCx went bye bye and I welcomed my new 2019 F3-S. I'm adding a detachable windshield and quick release Shad luggage for traveling. The more I ride it and get acclimated, the more fun I'm having. It's a hoot :)
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