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Anyone else use Moto Man How to break in a engine on ? -=MototuneUSA Car And Motorcycle Performance // PhotoBlog Did 25 miles loading the engine by opening the throttle hard in 2nd, 3rd and 4th gear alternateing between short bursts of hard acceleration and deceleration. Hit 25 miles and changed the oil and filter.Yeah - But ...
the owner's manual says to break it in easy ...

Notice that this technique isn't "beating" on the engine, but rather taking a purposeful, methodical approach to sealing the rings. The logic to this method is sound. However, some will have a hard time with this approach, since it seems to "go against the grain".

The argument for an easy break-in is usually: "that's what the manual says" ....

Or more specifically: "there are tight parts in the engine and you might do damage or even seize it if you run it hard."

Consider this:
Due to the vastly improved metal casting and machining technologies which are now used, tight parts in new engines are not normal. A manufacturing mistake causing a tight clearance is an extremely rare occurrence these days. But, if there is something wrong with the engine clearances from the factory, no amount of gentle running will fix the problem.

The real reason ???
So why do all the owner's manuals say to take it easy for the first
thousand miles ???

This is a good question ...

Q: What is the most common cause of engine problems ???
A: Failure to:
Warm the engine up completely before running it hard !!!

Q: What is the second most common cause of engine problems ???
A: An easy break in !!!

Because, when the rings don't seal well, the blow-by gasses contaminate the oil with acids and other harmful combustion by-products !!

Ironically, an "easy break in" is not at all what it seems. By trying to "protect" the engine, the exact opposite happens, as leaky rings continue to contaminate your engine oil for the rest of the life of your engine !!
 

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There are several schools of thought on this.

On one hand you have this guy on the internet with a sampling of empirical evidence telling you to beat your new engine like a rented mule.

One the other hand you have the engineering departments of EVERY motorcycle engine manufacturer instructing you to take it easy during the break-in period.

I'll go with the engineers.
 

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"Due to the vastly improved metal casting and machining technologies which are now used, tight parts in new engines are not normal. A manufacturing mistake causing a tight clearance is an extremely rare occurrence these days. But, if there is something wrong with the engine clearances from the factory, no amount of gentle running will fix the problem."

Oh there are manufacturing issues and out of tolerance parts making it out the door every day. I work in some of the most advanced engine manufacturing plants in the U.S., and although there have been huge advances in manufacturing quality, it still happens.
 

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Although I have no great knowledge how an engine breaks in or wears over its operational life, human nature is such that we tend to seek justification for our preferences. My guess is many motorcyclists don't want to break in their motorcycles according to the manual; however, I have to consider their opinions carefully and be ready to change my own when convincing and compelling evidence emerges that the manual is incorrect. That hasn't happened yet. Some of the break in recommendations I have read are oriented towards selling certain products. I understand that and tend to filter out such messages. I'm not disagreeing with the OP, just not convinced.
 

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Mercy... As FJRider stated; And as we all are aware of, any human with a computer (including me) can post their thoughts on engine break in or any other subject matter. Being the co-owner of an aerospace engineering company (feel free to verify that at Home ). Our company engineers modifications to all types of fixed winged craft. The cost of the last aircraft that we had hands on had a price tag of 13 million and believe me at this level mistakes in break in are not an option. The same goes for Yamaha, I would venture to guess Yamaha's R&D of the FZ-09 far exceeds this amount. That being said we've worked with some of the best engineer's on the planet who's careers not to mention the lives of countless passengers depend upon the equipment they design. In order not to bore you to death let me sum this up... aircraft are made up of thousands of tiny components each component has a specific life expectancy and a specific break in procedure. So like wise with a scoot which is also made up of thousands of smaller components.... in order to achieve the maximum life and durability of each component break in is a compromise.... meaning .... manufacturer's must find a middle ground to prevent unneeded wear to one component and yet provide adequate break in to a more sturdy component. For instance; Some vital transmission parts may need to be broken in slowly and with very little load while some engine components like rings may require a more "harsh" loading to achieve the same life expectancy and durability as the tranny part. So..... after running all the numbers.. stresses... tolerance's ... expected wear... etc..... the manufacture (who by the way is the only one who gets to see the complete picture) makes the final determination which will give him and his customers the best and most trouble free experience out of their product.
Yet who am I .... You bought the bike, you earned the $ to pay for it.... break it in the way you see fit. I don't care how you ride as long as you ride it.
 

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Anyone else use Moto Man How to break in a engine on ? -=MototuneUSA Car And Motorcycle Performance // PhotoBlog Did 25 miles loading the engine by opening the throttle hard in 2nd, 3rd and 4th gear alternateing between short bursts of hard acceleration and deceleration. Hit 25 miles and changed the oil and filter.Yeah - But ...
the owner's manual says to break it in easy ...

Notice that this technique isn't "beating" on the engine, but rather taking a purposeful, methodical approach to sealing the rings. The logic to this method is sound. However, some will have a hard time with this approach, since it seems to "go against the grain".

The argument for an easy break-in is usually: "that's what the manual says" ....

Or more specifically: "there are tight parts in the engine and you might do damage or even seize it if you run it hard."

Consider this:
Due to the vastly improved metal casting and machining technologies which are now used, tight parts in new engines are not normal. A manufacturing mistake causing a tight clearance is an extremely rare occurrence these days. But, if there is something wrong with the engine clearances from the factory, no amount of gentle running will fix the problem.

The real reason ???
So why do all the owner's manuals say to take it easy for the first
thousand miles ???

This is a good question ...

Q: What is the most common cause of engine problems ???
A: Failure to:
Warm the engine up completely before running it hard !!!

Q: What is the second most common cause of engine problems ???
A: An easy break in !!!

Because, when the rings don't seal well, the blow-by gasses contaminate the oil with acids and other harmful combustion by-products !!

Ironically, an "easy break in" is not at all what it seems. By trying to "protect" the engine, the exact opposite happens, as leaky rings continue to contaminate your engine oil for the rest of the life of your engine !!
Motoman's procedure does not advise to abuse the engine.It does explain that you need to develop high enough combustion pressures to allow the rings to seat themselves correctly.
Unfortunately, manufacturers feel they can't give the same directions for legal/liability reasons as the explanations are complex and easily misinterpreted, leading to potential catastrophic results if a rider was to crash while accelerating hard.
 

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Mercy... As FJRider stated; And as we all are aware of, any human with a computer (including me) can post their thoughts on engine break in or any other subject matter. Being the co-owner of an aerospace engineering company (feel free to verify that at Home ). Our company engineers modifications to all types of fixed winged craft. The cost of the last aircraft that we had hands on had a price tag of 13 million and believe me at this level mistakes in break in are not an option. The same goes for Yamaha, I would venture to guess Yamaha's R&D of the FZ-09 far exceeds this amount. That being said we've worked with some of the best engineer's on the planet who's careers not to mention the lives of countless passengers depend upon the equipment they design. In order not to bore you to death let me sum this up... aircraft are made up of thousands of tiny components each component has a specific life expectancy and a specific break in procedure. So like wise with a scoot which is also made up of thousands of smaller components.... in order to achieve the maximum life and durability of each component break in is a compromise.... meaning .... manufacturer's must find a middle ground to prevent unneeded wear to one component and yet provide adequate break in to a more sturdy component. For instance; Some vital transmission parts may need to be broken in slowly and with very little load while some engine components like rings may require a more "harsh" loading to achieve the same life expectancy and durability as the tranny part. So..... after running all the numbers.. stresses... tolerance's ... expected wear... etc..... the manufacture (who by the way is the only one who gets to see the complete picture) makes the final determination which will give him and his customers the best and most trouble free experience out of their product.
Yet who am I .... You bought the bike, you earned the $ to pay for it.... break it in the way you see fit. I don't care how you ride as long as you ride it.
As an asshat comeback, do you have your PE?......


I know it's really only the civil engineers that benefit, but I give my mechanical engineer buddies shit for not pursuing it... I'm taking the test next year... Fingers crossed.
 

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Motoman bases his advice from his lifetime experience with 300 engines.

Meanwhile Yamaha probably makes, and tests, more than 300 engines per day.

Your choice of who to believe.
 

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As an asshat comeback, do you have your PE?......


I know it's really only the civil engineers that benefit, but I give my mechanical engineer buddies shit for not pursuing it... I'm taking the test next year... Fingers crossed.
I do.

Be sure you master your static free body diagrams and your dynamics Diffy Q's. Strength of materials data tables will come in handy too.
 

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I've read Motoman's detailed break in procedure. I personally have two problems with it.
1- His focus is mainly on piston ring seating. He doesn't truly consider other components.
2- Q: What is the second most common cause of engine problems ???
A: An easy break in !!!
Also the above. If I remember correctly the owners manual states something like not maintaining a consistent RPM above 5600 during part of the break in period. Well 5600 is not an easy break in... meaning 5600 rpm's broken down is more than 93 revolutions per second. On a newly assembled, oil lubricated internal combustion engine this is by far not an easy break in.
 

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Motoman break in here as well.
Yamaha Engineers didn't write the break in process, their Legal team did. ;)
THIS! :)

I'll blend the two approaches, basically I'll vary the engine speed, load the engine, let it fully decel, and repeat but I won't have it within a 100rpm of redline while doing it. Same goes for bedding in the braking components - smooth, progressive applications so they seat together nicely but not overheat or glaze.

I'll swap the oil & filter after 100 miles or so and then take it moderately easy on the bike for another 50-100 miles but after 200-250 miles, there'll be no sparing the go stick!

Having said all that, I just realized that the bike is due to get a reflash and dyno tune once the suspension shop is done with it so in all likelyhood, it'll get shit-canned on the dyno with a whopping 40-50 miles on it. So much for an easy break in!
 

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I've read Motoman's detailed break in procedure. I personally have two problems with it.
1- His focus is mainly on piston ring seating. He doesn't truly consider other components.
2- Q: What is the second most common cause of engine problems ???
A: An easy break in !!!
Also the above. If I remember correctly the owners manual states something like not maintaining a consistent RPM above 5600 during part of the break in period. Well 5600 is not an easy break in... meaning 5600 rpm's broken down is more than 93 revolutions per second. On a newly assembled, oil lubricated internal combustion engine this is by far not an easy break in.
Yeah, but the Yamaha engineers don't provide a link to their favorite music.
:D
 

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As an asshat comeback, do you have your PE?......


I know it's really only the civil engineers that benefit, but I give my mechanical engineer buddies shit for not pursuing it... I'm taking the test next year... Fingers crossed.
For me it was the University of Alabama, Aerospace Engineering & Mechanics. Good luck in your endeavors.
 

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I just lugged it for the first 20 miles, then babied it.
What does that mean?
Full throttle away from a traffic light, then back off and cruise to the next light.

I wonder how they run in a diesel engine?
 

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For what it's worth, I broke in my new CBR 1000RR back in 2005 using the Motoman method. I sold it with 25,000 miles on it (including some heavy use track days) and it never burned any oil between changes and it actually ran a little better than my friend's identical 1000RR. That is the way the FZ09 got broke in too.
 
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