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Possible theory (Didn't want to hijack that other break- in thread too bad).

This thought occurred to me - Do you guys think newbie's get this (IMO bad) 'break it in hard' advice and take it a little too literally. This is why we se so many brand new & wrecked, low-mileage bikes? Not just FZ's but any sportbike, really.
 

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It may just be plain old inexperience. About 3 years ago, a guy died in our area when he rode his brand new bike straight out of the dealership and into the path of a car. Just froze, I guess.
 

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Agreed. It's not that they're trying to break it in hard, it's that they ride beyond they're skill level before getting accustomed to the New Bike. Very said.:cool:
 

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brand new & wrecked

I think it's a mixture of inexperience and peer pressure. Seen plenty of kids egged on by more experienced "friends" and they end up in a ditch. Like anything we do, riding is a skill you have to develop. Throwing a leg over a motorcycle thinking it's like riding a bicycle seems commonplace amongst the new.


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One of the guys I worked with was getting his first bike, but he was smart enough to take a good motorcycle safety course first. He hadn't quite decided what bike to get and one day after work I went with him to the local dealer to look at a few bikes. He was looking for more of a cruiser than a sport bike. He also knew the service manager at the bike shop, and the plan was to go pick his brain on what bikes are best for low maintenance.

So we met up with the Service Manager and as we were looking at bikes we passed the sport bike section. Jokingly he said "Maybe I should get a sport bike?" To which the Service Manager replied "No, you do not want a disposable bike." We both asked what he meant by that, and he replied. "Stay away from any sport bike, especially a used sport bike. To many sport bikes are bought by young guys with a need for speed and a superman complex. We see way to many sport bikes in less than a year end up in one of three ways.

1). The bike is crashed and needs thousands of dollars in repairs, and it is never quite right again. Hopefully those guys learn from their mistake and do not do it again.

2). The bike is crashed bad enough that it gets written off for good. These guys are either extremely lucky and walked away or ended up in the hospital with time to think about riding like an idiot. Some learn from their stupidity, some walk away and never ride again, and some don't learn and end up as the 3rd way.

3). These guys crash and don't walk away from their mistakes.

I was kind of surprised to hear that from the Service Manager, then he showed us the boneyard of crashed bikes they had hidden out back. There must have been thirty bikes sitting there, some not so bad and a few that were hard to tell they were even motorcycles. I hate to say it, but most of them were new crotch rockets with next to no miles on them. All sitting there waiting for the insurance companies to decide their fates.

Seeing stuff like this makes me wonder how long it will be before they make getting your motorcycle license like it works in the UK and Australia. Where you need to get some road experience under belt before you can graduate to a full size cc motorcycle.
 

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A motorcycle is an adult toy. Some adults are responsible, others ... .
 

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brand new & wrecked

One of the guys I worked with was getting his first bike, but he was smart enough to take a good motorcycle safety course first. He hadn't quite decided what bike to get and one day after work I went with him to the local dealer to look at a few bikes. He was looking for more of a cruiser than a sport bike. He also knew the service manager at the bike shop, and the plan was to go pick his brain on what bikes are best for low maintenance.

So we met up with the Service Manager and as we were looking at bikes we passed the sport bike section. Jokingly he said "Maybe I should get a sport bike?" To which the Service Manager replied "No, you do not want a disposable bike." We both asked what he meant by that, and he replied. "Stay away from any sport bike, especially a used sport bike. To many sport bikes are bought by young guys with a need for speed and a superman complex. We see way to many sport bikes in less than a year end up in one of three ways.

1). The bike is crashed and needs thousands of dollars in repairs, and it is never quite right again. Hopefully those guys learn from their mistake and do not do it again.

2). The bike is crashed bad enough that it gets written off for good. These guys are either extremely lucky and walked away or ended up in the hospital with time to think about riding like an idiot. Some learn from their stupidity, some walk away and never ride again, and some don't learn and end up as the 3rd way.

3). These guys crash and don't walk away from their mistakes.

I was kind of surprised to hear that from the Service Manager, then he showed us the boneyard of crashed bikes they had hidden out back. There must have been thirty bikes sitting there, some not so bad and a few that were hard to tell they were even motorcycles. I hate to say it, but most of them were new crotch rockets with next to no miles on them. All sitting there waiting for the insurance companies to decide their fates.

Seeing stuff like this makes me wonder how long it will be before they make getting your motorcycle license like it works in the UK and Australia. Where you need to get some road experience under belt before you can graduate to a full size cc motorcycle.
There have been a lot of talks about that over the years. The Coast Guard requires members to take the MSF course ever 5 years, plus the Sportbike riders course of you ride a Sportbike, t isn't quite a displacement restriction but it's a step in that direction. Haven't poked around the numbers to see whether this requirement has made much of a difference, but it's not necessarily a bad requirement. CG pays for the classes and it gets you off work for a couple days to ride haha


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There have been a lot of talks about that over the years. The Coast Guard requires members to take the MSF course ever 5 years, plus the Sportbike riders course of you ride a Sportbike, t isn't quite a displacement restriction but it's a step in that direction. Haven't poked around the numbers to see whether this requirement has made much of a difference, but it's not necessarily a bad requirement. CG pays for the classes and it gets you off work for a couple days to ride haha


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I've taken the MSF Clurse twice in the past ten years. It's a two day class that feed you some exercises to practice After the class and some food for thought. Without any practice or further thought as to how to develop genuine riding skills, the class amounts to an "Endorsement" to now go out and hurt yourself and possibly others.:cool:
 

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Rocky_MTN_FZ09's story is s good example. That's great sound advice from a smart manager. I suggest slower easier bikes whenever people ask me what to get. I've wanted a sport bike for a long time and ridden a few along the way but inside I always knew I wasn't ready yet. Kudos to that guy wanting to be safe in learning to ride!
 
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Rocky_MTN_FZ09's story is s good example. That's great sound advice from a smart manager. I suggest slower easier bikes whenever people ask me what to get. I've wanted a sport bike for a long time and ridden a few along the way but inside I always knew I wasn't ready yet. Kudos to that guy wanting to be safe in learning to ride!
+ 10000000

That Sales Manager was being honest because of a personal relationship. Sales Manager(s) have repeatedly told me that the high insurance rates for Sport Bikes & SS's is because of "the high rate of theft." These douchbags at the dealerships deny the sport bikes are more prone to accidents or an unusually high rate of accidents; They insist on high rates of theft -- Unfortunately, this brazen dishonestly contributes to the ongoing high rate of fatal and near fatal accidents.:(

We don't refer to them as Stealerships for nothing.:cool:
 
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Agreed. It's not that they're trying to break it in hard, it's that they ride beyond they're skill level before getting accustomed to the New Bike. Very said.:cool:
My first bike was a 1989 CBR600 in 2001. I had to put it together to be able to ride it. I took my time just around the block, learning the bike and the controls. I had this for a little while. Then I moved up to a 2000 Katana 750 in 2002. I had this for 12 years. Rode it all over. Then, I decided it was time to get a new bike. I was looking at the FZ1's, Z1000, speed triple R and a few others. I was looking at moving up in power and technology. Then I saw an article on the new FZ-09. I was intrigued. I went to the local dealer and looked at them. Sat on it and was surprised at how light it was compared to the Katana. I was even allowed to take it for a test ride, since it wasn't considered a sportbike. I was in love with the torque and seating position. I also knew to be gentle and easy on the throttle since I never been on the bike before. Even after I bought it, I took it easy for the first week or so. Gradually moving up to the level the bike was capable of.
 

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My first bike was a 1989 CBR600 in 2001. I had to put it together to be able to ride it. I took my time just around the block, learning the bike and the controls. I had this for a little while. Then I moved up to a 2000 Katana 750 in 2002. I had this for 12 years. Rode it all over. Then, I decided it was time to get a new bike. I was looking at the FZ1's, Z1000, speed triple R and a few others. I was looking at moving up in power and technology. Then I saw an article on the new FZ-09. I was intrigued. I went to the local dealer and looked at them. Sat on it and was surprised at how light it was compared to the Katana. I was even allowed to take it for a test ride, since it wasn't considered a sportbike. I was in love with the torque and seating position. I also knew to be gentle and easy on the throttle since I never been on the bike before. Even after I bought it, I took it easy for the first week or so. Gradually moving up to the level the bike was capable of.
+ 10000000000

Smart. Very smart.:)

How often do we meet someone riding a MC and walk away thinking this dude is smart, thinks things out well, and utilizes good judgement on the road with his bike....???

In 3 words: Not Often Enough! :cool:
 

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Most modern sportbikes can travel at, and in some cases, exceed, highway speeds in first gear. The idea of running a bike all the way up to redline on a somewhat frequent basis while trying to break it in has some logistical problems involved. I'm not saying it doesn't carry validity, but the idea of trying to make it a reality is laughable. And anyone who tries to, especially if they aren't an experienced rider, yeah, I can see why it might cause some "mishaps."
 

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My personal example is a friend wanted to get himself a 600 cbr or gsxr but didn't even know clutch yet. I said you shouldn't get one because they're too powerful, but he didn't believe me. I brought out my 30 year old 250 dirt bike to teach him to ride. After riding around my apartment complex for an hour he was shocked at how powerful it was and was glad i didn't help him buy a crotch rocket. Even the slowest bike is more powerful than normal cars. People just can't wrap their head around how powerful until you show them.
 

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Even experienced riders need to watch out for themselves. Ive seen a few people lay it down after getting new tires. Riding it like they did the day before, not expecting there to be anything different. New tires are "greasy".
 

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Even experienced riders need to watch out for themselves. Ive seen a few people lay it down after getting new tires. Riding it like they did the day before, not expecting there to be anything different. New tires are "greasy".
New tires used to be "greasy" but they haven't been that way for the last 4 years. New tire mold technology does not require any mold release compound on the new tires. The real reason people crash on new tires is because they do not allow a mile or two on the tire to get any heat in it to warm it up. Cold asphalt compounds the problem.

Back on subject...a lot of new riders bought FZ09's during winter months when the asphalt was really cold. New rider....too much torque...jerky throttle......tire not warmed to operating temperature...equals crash. Now that the weather is warmer...we should be seeing a lot less crashes from the noobs.
 

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I got all you guys beat. I started on a 50cc scooter at the age of 14.

BTW All this talk about sport bike crashes, you guys know that cruisers make up a much larger majority of wrecked motorcycles than do sport bikes.

To answer the Op, I would imagine the large amount of fairly new FZ09's is causally related to the fact that the bike is still new and its ratio of $ to Hp is low. In other words, the bike hasn't been out for a 1/15 of the time most SS's have, thus there are not that many high mileage FZ's around. Furthermore, the FZ09 has 115hp/65 tq with a wet weight of 415bs. That HP number is on par with modern 600cc SS and the torque is higher, and the weight is the same, all for $8000, or $2000 less than a 600cc SS, both being new of course.
 

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Well I think it's partly all the previously mentioned things but I also believe this particular bike lends itself to be easily overridden. It's super light weight combined with all that power are two elements that make this bike so fun and fierce. They also make it very dangerous, heck I've got over 20yrs of experience and mine has come dang close to biting me several times. I've never taken a riding course of any kind but I am now planning on doing it just because of this bike.
I want to ride it to it's fullest potential without being a danger to myself or those around me.
 
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