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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
With all the great professionals and professional hobbyist on this awesome forum that give their time, advice and “how to” knowledge, I say Thank you. With that being said, can we kick around some alternatives to the stock rotors and pads? I would be very interested in hearing all opinions on the various aftermarket products available, i.e. EBC, Galfer, Brembo, Braking etc. I am looking to get this bad a$$ machine to slow down a little better, but using the search box I have never found a comprehensive review of all the alternatives to stock. Your opinion is valued and welcomed. Thanks.
 

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Using the 320mm EBC rotors here with the EBC HH Pro pads. They are great! (If your suspension is setup to handle the extra braking powwaaa) I swap the oem 15mm master cylinder for a 16mm (FZ8... miror still fit).

There's few good option to upgrade pads/master to keep the stock rotors or at least stock diameter. For track days it would be a bit borderline to me. I think with the 320mm I have more brake that I actually need but I prefer using 80% of what I have than 100% of the OEM.
 

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Marthy did you go floating rotors? Inquiring minds want to know.

Ride Safe
 

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FZ Rider.....in my honest opinion, unless you are just wanting to spend a goodly amount of money on brakes, the stock rotors are perfectly capable chunks of metal. I would replace the OEM lines with a quality set of stainless braided lines and get rid of that spongy feel. As a reference point, I am a very late and hard braker and after the lines being changed out, I personally don't find the need for additional braking power. I'm also running the OEM brake pads. Keep in mind that I'm not doing track days on this bike, and if I were, I'd would be running Vesrah RJL pads up front. It's up to you, but in my humble opinion, you would most likely be wasting some money if all you are concerned about is additional braking power and not bling.
 
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In this order:

1. Lines w/ high temp fluid
2. Pads
3. Radial master cylinder (R6 or equivalent).
4. Rotors

The stock rotor size is more than adequate. The current crop of supersports are running 310 mm discs up front (FZ is 298), but they are also capable of much higher speeds. Going larger will provide more brake torque, but IMO, it isn't required - even on the track. Going larger will add weight and increase the front wheel assembly's polar moment of inertia - i.e., will increase steering effort and reduce suspension compliance. There were a confluence of factors why I went with Galfer rotors, but the primary reason was overheating the pads at the track. The stock rotors have fewer buttons than a high performance rotor, so the heat transfer to the wheel was inhibited a bit. Street riding wasn't an issue for me. In the case of the Galfers, their wave rotors are actually 0.35 lb lighter (each). Very noticeable difference!
 

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FZ Rider.....in my honest opinion, unless you are just wanting to spend a goodly amount of money on brakes, the stock rotors are perfectly capable chunks of metal. I would replace the OEM lines with a quality set of stainless braided lines and get rid of that spongy feel. As a reference point, I am a very late and hard braker and after the lines being changed out, I personally don't find the need for additional braking power. I'm also running the OEM brake pads. Keep in mind that I'm not doing track days on this bike, and if I were, I'd would be running Vesrah RJL pads up front. It's up to you, but in my humble opinion, you would most likely be wasting some money if all you are concerned about is additional braking power and not bling.
I second this, and I'm a big fan of having adequate brakes. I find the stockers plenty capable for street use. Add braided lines for better feel and you're golden. Proper weighted front springs will alleviate some of the brake dive. You can also tune your braking feel by changing master cylinders.

For pads, I've been really impressed with FERODO's on my previous street bike. Much more consistant that EBC HH's which were on prior to those.
 

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SS lines, EBC HH pads, and better fluid did the trick for me. My bike will lift the rear wheel braking hard hauling it down without effort. Also, I pulled the lever in overnight and trimmed my light trigger because of the reduced throw of the lever.
 

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SS lines, EBC HH pads, and better fluid did the trick for me. My bike will lift the rear wheel braking hard hauling it down without effort. Also, I pulled the lever in overnight and trimmed my light trigger because of the reduced throw of the lever.
aren't the HH pads super harsh on stock rotors? They're probably overkill for daily riding
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Great feedback! I think I'll start with Nicks list and stop when it feels right to the touch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
On a side note......you going to try and make the FZ rally this June?
Trying to work out the details with my brother, he lives in Indiana and wants to come ride the roads. He rides a speed triple, but I don't hold that against him. I think this gathering would be a good trip for both of us. Hoping I can get it worked out.
 

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I changed to DP (dunlop pads) HH rated for the front on my last MT after i upgraded the suspension to cope.
The stock brakes were good, just changing the pads made more of a difference than i thought they would.
Will probably do the same when i get my new one. Wasnt too concerned with extra wear, because than i'd change the rotors to galfers.

I found chaging just the pads almost enough for the street, a new MC and lines (like marthy) would improve feel a bit, HH pads gave me enough power.
 

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Hmmm... I don't usually give much thought to fluid. Just the proper DOT whatever. Got a few more details on what to look for in a brake fluid?
Look for the highest boiling points...both wet and dry. Dry boiling point indicates the temperature that new fluid will boil. Wet boiling point indicates the temperature the fluid will boil at once it's absorbed moisture from the air (all but DOT 5 fluids are hygroscopic - hence why the fluid needs to be changed on a regular basis). The higher the boiling points, the less of a chance you'll have of brake fade when used hard. Lots of good options out there...RBF600, ATE Blue, and there are some decent Valvoline and Castrol products commonly available locally.
 

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Motul RBF 600 is the one that I use and have for quite some time......good stuff. And again, Nick is on it!
 
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