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It's no secret that warming up tires before mounting or removing them makes the job a littIe easier so FJ Rod showed up at my place this morning with his "not to be copywrited or patented tire heater".
It's a big foam box lined with thin aluminum that has a heat lamp on top.
Pop in a couple of tires, flick on the switch and wait.
Keep in mind we live in the "Sunshine State" but now there's no need to lay all these tires out in the driveway for fifteen or twenty minutes when you can put two of them in this magic box for half an hour.

This all goes back to the time when Muc, Rod and I were riding and I pointed out to FJ Rod, about forty miles from home, that the cords were showing in his rear tire.
He headed home, removed the wheel, threw a new tire in the truck and arrived back at my house around nine in the evening.
This was in January, forty five degrees and dark outside. Add in the fact it was a Dunlop Roadsmart, you know the ones with fiberglass sidewalls and infamous for being a PITA. Well I fought that bitch of a tire and finally got it changed and then told Rod that if he planned ahead we wouldn't need to struggle so much so his solution was to reduce the floor space in my storage shed so we could have this box the next time we needed to change one of his tires in the middle of the night.
Tire Heater By Rod! 001.JPG
Tire Heater By Rod! 002.JPG
 

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Lol, yeah that was a struggle that I repeated with my first tire change on the no mar, but it was 32* in Ohio. I resorted to a contractor bag and a hair dryer. Not as elegant of a solution, but a warm tire is definitely much easier to get on, lesson learned the hard way. I might have to steal bits of this not so patented idea.
 

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Usually keep mine in the floorboard of my SUV and crank climate control to high for 20min on the feet
 
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My DR650 has tube tires, so a simple plug fix on a flat is not an option. It requires tire removal and new tube or patch job. One of the posters on the DR forum said he uses five 24" heavy duty zip ties spaced evenly around the tire and rim each installed with the wheel at the 12 oclock position, pulled tight and ends trimmed off. This keeps the tire from coming off while he rides the bike home or to a convenient location. His longest ride this way has been 30+ miles going slowly on the shoulder of the road. Once home, he patches the tube or puts in a new one and is back in business with no damage to the tire. The risk of riding on a flat is the tire coming off the rim. If it stays on the rim, it will support the bike and rider. Dirt riders frequently air down their tires when off road.

Instead of carrying tire changing tools, front and rear tubes (heavy and bulky) and air source, I carry a handful of zip ties. My rear tire is almost impossible to break the bead. Laying it out on the asphalt driveway in the hot sun will be done from now on after reading the warm tire trick. Good to know.
 

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Nifty idea but us city folk do not have space to spare in our tight garages.

Tire warmers does the trick for me. Just roll them back up and stick in a corner when done. Searching through trackday or club racing forums and you will surely run into used tire warmers for sale.
 

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I've never had the problem, but I haven't changed dozens of tyres either. But we did have some old Harley tyres that a guy wanted fitting. That POS rear tyre went on finally, but we couldn't get the beads to contact the rim so that we could inflate it. Even the gas canister and flame trick didn't work.
I went home and left the mechanic to it. I think he finally manged with a plug of gelignite.
 
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