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Discussion Starter · #21 ·
I took my old shims to a local dealership and they swapped them out for me for free. If yours isn't as cool they may "sell" you just the ones you need. You can likely shuffle yours around and get say half of them in spec and only buy a few others... I just hated the idea of buying an entire kit for something i should only have to adjust once.

back to the questions though. Doesn't matter where the crank is for re-installing the valve cover. But as vcycle said; there is a very specific procedure for removing/reinstalling the cams. You mentioned not adjusting yourself and only checking. But with what all you've done I don't feel that removing the cams and replacing shims is very much more effort personally.
Thanks for your reply, dcpppf. I’ve been reading a lot of your comments on this subject and found them helpful. I’ve decided to tackle this task myself, been going over it step by step in my head this past week, but didn’t have time because of work. Did anyone else have a hard time gettng the CCT bolts out? Mine feels like someone put 100 ft. lbs on it lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #22 ·
For your enjoyment; my dealership estimated $1600 for the 26k service. Welcome to Norway, I guess.
 

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Thanks for your reply, dcpppf. I’ve been reading a lot of your comments on this subject and found them helpful. I’ve decided to tackle this task myself, been going over it step by step in my head this past week, but didn’t have time because of work. Did anyone else have a hard time gettng the CCT bolts out? Mine feels like someone put 100 ft. lbs on it lol.
You need to remove the center bolt first then insert the tool " a cut down 3mm hex key " and turn counter clock-wise to lock in the plunger in the open position to relieve the pressure then remove the two attaching bolts ! Looks like in your reading you missed a part !
 

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You need to remove the center bolt first then insert the tool " a cut down 3mm hex key " and turn counter clock-wise to lock in the plunger in the open position to relieve the pressure then remove the two attaching bolts ! Looks like in your reading you missed a part !
^ what he said. shouldn't be too bad otherwise. just be slow and careful not to scratch your frame.

Two other tips... 1, once you remove the cams... don't touch the crank. You'll give yourself a mini heart attack even though it's pretty easy to get it back in time. and 2. when you're reinstalling the cams. reinstall the CCT before you tighten down the cam caps. CCT doesn't have to be tight, but enough to keep the cams from spinning on you. One of the intake lobes slightly contacts a bucket and will skip a tooth on you as you tighten the caps if you aren't careful. Took me 4-5 attempts before i put the CCT on to help out.

and don't forget that one crank rotation (360*) = half a cam rotation... Seems like a lot of "wtf" moments come up and people forget that. So if something seems funky just step back and think about it for a few.
 
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This is the way I do it:

Step 1: After the clearance check turn the crank so that all 3 marks line up, the 2 on the cams and the one on the flywheel. There are 2 marks on the flywheel, one at #1 TDC and the other one is at #1 125 degrees BTDC. The #1 TDC is a strait line and the #1 at 125 degrees looks like a sideways V. Its the V shaped one you use for cam timing. I use a paint pen to highlight the correct timing mark so its easy to find if you turn the crank somehow while its apart.

Step 2: Remove CCT, then the cams, swap shims.

Step 3: Install the Cams. When reinstalling the cams set them so that the timing marks are pointing the the correct orientation.

Step 4: install the cam chain with all the marks lined up, this can be a bit tricky, I use tie straps on each cam sprocket to keep the chain from slipping.

Step 5: Reinstall the CCT ensuring all the slack in the chain is on the CCT side.

Step 6: Check the timing marks again, remove tie straps.

Step 7: The most important step. Turn the crank 2 complete revolutions with the spark plugs removed. Check to see if your marks all line up again. Go slowly, it should turn easily, if you feel the crank stop suddenly STOP. Take the cam caps off and start over.
 

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Step 7: The most important step. Turn the crank 2 complete revolutions with the spark plugs removed. Check to see if your marks all line up again. Go slowly, it should turn easily, if you feel the crank stop suddenly STOP. Take the cam caps off and start over.
Good advice, it takes very little force at the crank to bend a valve if the timing is off.
 

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Discussion Starter · #27 ·
You need to remove the center bolt first then insert the tool " a cut down 3mm hex key " and turn counter clock-wise to lock in the plunger in the open position to relieve the pressure then remove the two attaching bolts ! Looks like in your reading you missed a part !
Yep! Sure missed that, cheers.

^ what he said. shouldn't be too bad otherwise. just be slow and careful not to scratch your frame.

Two other tips... 1, once you remove the cams... don't touch the crank. You'll give yourself a mini heart attack even though it's pretty easy to get it back in time. and 2. when you're reinstalling the cams. reinstall the CCT before you tighten down the cam caps. CCT doesn't have to be tight, but enough to keep the cams from spinning on you. One of the intake lobes slightly contacts a bucket and will skip a tooth on you as you tighten the caps if you aren't careful. Took me 4-5 attempts before i put the CCT on to help out.

and don't forget that one crank rotation (360*) = half a cam rotation... Seems like a lot of "wtf" moments come up and people forget that. So if something seems funky just step back and think about it for a few.
I saw someone ziptied the chain to the sprockets, would this help me avoid skipping teeth? So insert CCT and zip tie chain/sprockets. This is the part im worried most about tbh, installing the CCT and hoping it all doesn’t go to ****.
 

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Wabo, cjmiller did a nice documentation of his valve adjustment experience and his thread is well worth reading
You're welcome!
 

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Discussion Starter · #29 ·
Wabo, cjmiller did a nice documentation of his valve adjustment experience and his thread is well worth reading
You're welcome!
Read it 10 times. But I wanted some more assistance. As a complete beginner I found the guide a bit lacking in some areas, but you guys filled in the gaps.
 

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I did a little video when I did mine....doesn't explain everything but might help if you get stuck.

 

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Discussion Starter · #32 ·
I'll just post here instead of making a new thread.

I'm having trouble finding BTDC.

Probably did 30 revolutions now trying to get the BTDC mark on the generator rotor (triangle thingy) to align at the same time as punch marks on camshaft lobes. What am I doing wrong?

Triangle, but no punch marks:

Punch marks but no triangle:
 

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I'll err on the side of caution, cheers.
The minimum clearance is not an absolute threshold that must not be crossed. It is just the acceptable narrowest gap that the engine is safe to use at for long periods.
i.e. when the gap becomes smaller than the minimum, the valves do not immediately fail to seal.
 

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I'll just post here instead of making a new thread.

I'm having trouble finding BTDC.

Probably did 30 revolutions now trying to get the BTDC mark on the generator rotor (triangle thingy) to align at the same time as punch marks on camshaft lobes. What am I doing wrong?

Triangle, but no punch marks:

Punch marks but no triangle:
If you are just checking clearances and not reassembling after removing the cam shafts, you only need to pay attention to TDC on the cylinder you are checking.
Use a wooden dowel down the spark plug hole to tell when you are approaching TDC and check the mark on the rotor to confirm it. Hold the dowel so it is perpendicular to the piston crown to eliminate any chance it gets jammed crooked in the spark plug hole. The position of the cam lobes on the cylinder you are checking should be pointing away from the follower if you are on the compression stroke. If the exhaust and inlet cam lobes are depressing the followers ,then you are on the exhaust stroke at TDC,in which case you need to turn the crank one turn to get on the compression stroke at TDC.
Measure the clearances.
Then move to the next cylinder ,repeating the process.
The punch marks are not necessary, they are there to allow approximate positioning of the cam shafts prior to putting the cam chain back on the sprockets. The main cam shaft timing marks are the ones on the sprockets.

What I do is put a cable tie ,tight around the cam chain just above the crankshaft sprocket to prevent the chain losing its position on the sprocket.
Use a marker or paint to mark the positions of the chain on each cam sprocket so you can line them up again (mark the chain and the sprocket - use fuel or contact cleaner to flush oil away before marking),
Remove the CCT.
Remove the cams,
Use the marks to reposition the chain on the sprockets the way it was originally.
Replace the CCT
Remove the cable tie.
 

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turn the crank counterclockwise viewed from the left hand side of the bike, when the cam timing marks are getting close to being lining up, turn the crank slowly until you can see the mark on the flywheel, It flies by that window pretty quick so go slowly.

It looks like you where on the wrong stroke in the first video, and was just off the mark in the second video

The marks line up every second revolution on the crank
 

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Discussion Starter · #36 ·
turn the crank counterclockwise viewed from the left hand side of the bike, when the cam timing marks are getting close to being lining up, turn the crank slowly until you can see the mark on the flywheel, It flies by that window pretty quick so go slowly.

It looks like you where on the wrong stroke in the first video, and was just off the mark in the second video

The marks line up every second revolution on the crank
Yep. When the flywheel did a "skip" I went just past the mark. I ended up having to turn it clock-wise a few degrees to get back to where I needed to be.
 

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^ My trick is to lock my ratchet so when the flywheel tries to swing past it; it can't. well it can but my ratchet doesn't let it free spin past since it is locked.
 

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It can also help if you remove all the spark plugs, makes the engine easier to turn, and the compression in the cylinder isn't trying to force the piston back down off of TDC.
 
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