Yamaha FZ-09 Forum banner

1 - 20 of 53 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
After reading so many threads, it seems like crashing is a part of riding. I have not crashed and would rather keep it that way. I'm hoping this isn't inevitable. How many of you have not crashed?!? Is crashing part of riding aggressively or chance?
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #3 ·
And, after careful consideration, I think the most dangerous thing that I do that has the potential to get me killed is walking through parking lots in NY. The drivers don't look. They just pull out, even if you are directly behind their cars. And they come flying around the corner, not a care in the world. This is much more dangerous than the motorcycle riding.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,008 Posts
Just once that I didn't ride away from, a 70mph fawn, was taken to the hospital but they rejected me. But if you don't define crash so tightly then too much.

"Is crashing part of riding aggressively or chance?"

There are other possibilities, common ones. Non aggressive riding but you get into a situation you aren't ready for, or should have avoided but didn't, or you spaced out etc. Maybe that is what you meant by chance? I don't call that chance.

A chance motorcycle accident would be something like you are riding along and a meteorite hits you. Not-chance: a tree limb falls in front of you. You saw the tree, stuff falls out of trees, be ready. Might be bad luck, but just calling it chance makes the rider too passive.

I know I live and ride in deer country, I should have seen Bambi and mom sooner.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I do mean chance- things that you can't control. Things that riding skill won't help you with.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
260 Posts
I have been riding since 1988, and have never been down at speed on pavement. Like you Jen, I once fell on wet grass as a new rider. The closest I have come to going down, many years ago, was hitting some sand that washed across the road on a switchback in the rain. It was a feet off the pegs near highside. I learned from that, as I do every time I ride, to anticipate potential problems before they happen.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #8 ·
The closest I came was when I first started riding, less than a hundred miles on a Suzuki S40 and the rear tire felt like it was going to slide out because when I downshifted, the revs weren't where they were supposed to be. It wasn't that close, but it was the only thing that ever felt wrong when I was on a bike, but it was okay in the end. That was definitely rider error. I also remember starting that S40 in second gear at a light once or twice. Since the bike was so light, it wasn't an issue. If I were to stall a heavier bike, it would likely go over. My husband has stalled heavier bikes, but he is strong and can save it. I have felt that unstable feeling on my Sportster, once at a stop sign, but it didn't go over. I wouldn't be able to save it if it did though. That's something where if you are a guy, there wouldn't be an issue if the bike got out of balance. I think that having the gear indicator has saved me from dumb things like starting in second. I love the gear indicator, it makes me feel much more confident since it's one less thing to worry about. I can concentrate on other things. I remember taking one of those Ninja 300 bikes out on a test ride and not having the gear indicator. It was weird having to kick it to first, back to neutral because I was paranoid, and down to first at the light. I have never done that on the FZ since we have the gear indicator.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
I've been riding since I was 8..I'm 43 now. I've ridden 5 days a week on average since I was 16. I've had half a dozen crashes, one that injured me, badly. I ride trials, trails, motocross tracks, road and track. I have a habit getting too confident on road, when I'm away from the track too long. I had a crash at night in icy conditions, as a teenager. Apart from that, all my crashes have been on road, either from inattention or pushing too hard for the conditions. My wife has been riding almost as long, and had two or three losses of balance. Due more to lack of seat time than anything else.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,253 Posts
Discussion Starter · #11 ·
Yeah, I put frame sliders on. Just in case I do something stupid. I realize that riding a motorcycle is not risk free, but nothing in life is. I see kids coming in to my class all the time because they are getting concussions playing football and soccer. I wouldn't tell them not to play.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
I would suggest, and this is just my opinion, that there is always something unforseen that can catch you out. A diesel spill on a hairpin corner in early morning, head on low sun, for example..... invisible, sudden and very hard to save, depending on your entry speed!

The important factor is seat time. The more you ride, in varying conditions and on different surfaces.. the more you learn, the more your muscle strength and memory grows. The more automatic your response to a sudden change in situation becomes.

And always keeping something in reserve...as in never riding beyond 80% of your capabilities, is probably a good way to refrain from eating it. Probably. :D
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
226 Posts
Oh....I just remembered the time I came around a blind corner and there was a tree across the whole road. If I'd been going slower I wouldn't have hit it so hard! lol
Carbon fibre wheels are stronger than you think!.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,079 Posts
I've been riding since Im 6 yo. So I had my share of crash! So far so good lately...

Im taking it relatively easy these days. Other that few acceleration and track days I keep things within the no kill myself zone. I know my limits and ride accordingly. Snowbird season is right around the block again... I'll be more aware. LOL
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
464 Posts
ive had one fall so far at low speeds, around 5-10 mph coming around a turn. leaned over a little more than i should have and hit just enough dirt/sand on the road to slide out the wheels, fell in front of a house where two people were having a conversation, they didn't seem to care. i also just watched a guy drop his bike pulling out of my local dealer yesterday.came to a stop and just kinda lost balance. things happen sometimes and id rather it be my fault at very low speed than something else much worse
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,070 Posts
I feel like this should be retitled the jinx yourself thread! I've only been riding for a little over two years. Closest I've been to dropping it was forgetting to put my kickstand down (stupid...). Felt like I pulled every muscle on the left half of my body... But I was able to stand her back up.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,476 Posts
Ive never been down on a street bike, cant say the same about dirt bikes.

30 years of riding and counting:eagerness:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
167 Posts
I have had several dirt bike crashes. All part of the learning curve. I have been riding since I was 12, I am now 51. I have been rear ended at a stop light when I was 17, slow speed. Didn't fall over. I have been t boned in Fort Lauderdale when I was in the service visiting my sister on spring break. Drunk driver coming out of a hotel parking lot. I was making a left turn and caught him out of the corner of my eye commingling at me. I was knocked over but only a few minor scratches and minimal bike damage to my Suzuki 1100. Not as lucky in cars. I rolled a car, and was t bone by a semi going 60. I think I was meant to be on two wheels.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
511 Posts
There is an old saying. There are two kinds of riders, those that have been down and those that are going down. Not trying to jinx you but if you ride enough it is inevitable. To think you will never fall off is foolish. To prepare like you will fall off is better. I'll spare you the broken ankle, dislocated shoulder stories and just say be careful. Don't ride if you aren't feeling well and know your limits. Many crashes are single vehicle, that means no car caused it, only the rider. Enough safety talk, time for some wheelies!
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
637 Posts
Interesting question.
When I was a young squid, I did find all the limits caused by rain, changes in road surfaces, leaning too much in the rain, black ice, roads covered with diesel fuel, chalk and running out of lean angle caused by footpegs that didn't fold up. Then after one particular crash where my riding buddy ran over me while I was on the ground, I did manage to back off and slow down.
Then after moving to the states, I've only had one hit with a driver turning in front of me at the last second.

With all the phone distractions and the I don't care attitude displayed by cage drivers today , the odds are pretty high, but the odds can be overcome and they are not cumulative. I have managed to drive to work for the last 30 years without being hit. Quite a few close calls and that is why you wear a full face helmet and put a nice loud horn (horns) on the bike (I call them teaching devices). And wear some kind of protective gear, although if you are going to get run down by a truck or SUV, it won't do you any good. So just wear something you feel comfortable in and will protect you from the way you ride.
Full face helmet is a must with all the debris on the road.
 
1 - 20 of 53 Posts
Top