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I want to install anti-theft switch, what is the best wire to cut and if possible, picture!
 

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If you don't need the side stand safety switch, you can use that. The wires run up under the tank to a connector. You can clip the wires to the side stand switch and solder a switch to that.
 

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Hate to be negative...but no "anti-theft" switch is ever going to deter any bike thief. The way most bikes are stolen is....two guys roll up in a van...open the side doors....pick your bike up...and throw it in the van...and haul ass. No bike thief is going to stand there and try to break the steering lock {which isn't possible} and then take another ten minutes pulling the ignition wires and making it run without blowing a fuse. In other words...your "switch" is a waste of time. If you don't want anybody to steal your bike....chain that bitch to a tree or a pole with a good quality chain and lock.
 

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My son's Daytona 675 was stolen while parked on the street in SF. They found it a few days later with the ignition switch punched out, which lets you turn the switch with a screw driver. Will it stop a professional? No. But it can be a deterrent to a more casual thief. The Daytona is now his track bike- the tow yard where they took it after recovery caused more damage than the thief, punching holes in the front fender, damaging the fairing, and scratching the hell out of the wheels and forks. The thief had also locked it with a U-lock which the tow yard left on. They dragged it around with the U-lock, used chains to hold it in the truck used to deliver it. And they had only one guy delivering it so he dragged it up the driveway, rear wheel locked up due to the U-lock. Took me four minutes with an angle grinder and cutoff wheel to remove the lock.
 

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If you don't need the side stand safety switch, you can use that. The wires run up under the tank to a connector. You can clip the wires to the side stand switch and solder a switch to that.
I don't see why you couldn't keep the side stand switch, and wire another switch into the same circuit.
 

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My anti theft is full coverage..if they want my bike, they can have it..Ill just buy a new one with the insurance money
 
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Hate to be negative...but no "anti-theft" switch is ever going to deter any bike thief. The way most bikes are stolen is....two guys roll up in a van...open the side doors....pick your bike up...and throw it in the van...and haul ass. No bike thief is going to stand there and try to break the steering lock {which isn't possible} and then take another ten minutes pulling the ignition wires and making it run without blowing a fuse. In other words...your "switch" is a waste of time. If you don't want anybody to steal your bike....chain that bitch to a tree or a pole with a good quality chain and lock.
You are wrong. At least according to this former bike thief:

"There is this common misconception that a few guys load bikes into trucks and vans. The people who get CAUGHT load bikes into trucks and vans. Your career will be very short if you're loading a 185mph rocket (that likely has a tracking system) that will outrun the police into the back of an 85mph van that will take you to the scene of your arrest. If you can't start the bike and ride off then you damn sure can't find and remove lojack.
In 10-15 years I've known a couple dozen thieves and only one that was foolish enough to load bikes into a truck or van for any length of time. He learned to wire them after he was caught, twice, lol."

Check out this thread if you want to get some inside info on how to protect your bike, it's gold: EX Thief & "chop-shop" operator AMA : motorcycles
 

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Here is another good quote from the Reddit AMA regarding "No bike thief is going to stand there and try to break a steering lock":

"I've had passers by walk right past, it happened on the very first bike I stole, some lady walked her dogs right passed us. There were two of us in riding gear, two bikes, she didn't even look twice. We kept working and rode off. This didn't happen to me, but the guy that got me into all this. He's getting some bike from an apartment complex in the middle of the day and can't break the steering. He notices some guy watching him, walks right up to him and says "Hey man, can you give me a hand, the handlebars on my bike are stuck and I'm about to be late for work." - The guy goes back to the bike and helps him break the steering lock. That guy has some CRAZY stories, he was stone cold and willing to go way way too far. Probably why he's dead now."
 

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I don't see why you couldn't keep the side stand switch, and wire another switch into the same circuit.
You're right- it can be. I'm not a fan of the side stand switch though. In the past, it failed on my SRX600 and left me stuck on the side of the road for several minutes until I devised a jumper to bypass it at the connector under the seat. So my side stand switch is disconnected. If installing a switch, I would recomment a blinking LED as a potential visual deterrent and a reminder that the switch is activated.
 

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You are wrong. At least according to this former bike thief:

"There is this common misconception that a few guys load bikes into trucks and vans. The people who get CAUGHT load bikes into trucks and vans.
I don't know how thieves operate in Norway...but here in the US and in Great Britian....MOST bikes are picked up and thrown in a van. Here's and article by a bike magazine.
Kiss it Goodbye | Sport Rider
 

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I can personally confirm the 'pick up and toss it in a truck' method of theft--had 2 stolen that same way in the past 15 years. For my money(and piece of mind) nothing beats a good set of Kryptonite chains and locks, along with a 130 db alarm for extra layer of protection. Most thieves are snatch and grab and not smart enough to take the time to bust out the ignition lock. It takes 30 sec to pick it up and throw it in a truck--I'm guessing it takes longer to pop the ignition and try to disable my alarm if not chained to something solid...
 

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I don't know how thieves operate in Norway...but here in the US and in Great Britian....MOST bikes are picked up and thrown in a van. Here's and article by a bike magazine.
Kiss it Goodbye | Sport Rider
Thanks for the article, the stats on which type of MC that got stolen was as I thought. However the article is from 1998, and the author doesn't come with any sources for his information on how the bikes are stolen - it looks like he has written the article based on his beliefs without any statistics to back it up (except type of bike stolen and which state).

Please read some of the posts made by the former bike thief, he lived in the USA: "I was basically a normal American kid who was very shy and did well in school." Just give it a quick read and then make up your mind: EX Thief & "chop-shop" operator AMA : motorcycles
 

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Think fuel cutoff - NOT electrical cutoff. The thief drives away only to have it stall a minute later. He won't want to spend time diagnosing the issue in the middle of traffic. He'll drop it and walk away.
 

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No bike thief is going to stand there and try to break the steering lock {which isn't possible}
steering locks are very easy to defeat. youtube has instructional videos. the 09's convoluted engine stop/starter switch is a better theft deterrent than the steering lock.

that said, i agree that locking the bike to a stationary object is the best way to secure it short of parking it in a vault.
 

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Thanks for the article, the stats on which type of MC that got stolen was as I thought. However the article is from 1998, and the author doesn't come with any sources for his information on how the bikes are stolen - it looks like he has written the article based on his beliefs without any statistics to back it up (except type of bike stolen and which state).

Please read some of the posts made by the former bike thief, he lived in the USA: "I was basically a normal American kid who was very shy and did well in school." Just give it a quick read and then make up your mind: EX Thief & "chop-shop" operator AMA : motorcycles
I have read the article and have seen it before you posted. Back in the day most thieves DID hotwire a bike and ride off...but they don't anymore. Nowdays bikes have theft proof wire harnesses like the 2001 FZ1 I owned. If the ignition switch wires were cut...the CPU would register a difference in Ohm resistance and not allow the bike to start. The ones that don't have anti theft harness...some have chipped ignition keys. No key...no start. Almost ALL bikes nowadays have the ignition switch RIVITED to the underside of the top triple clamp...meaning the only way to access that switch and wires is to remove the top clamp and DRILL out the rivets. So yeah...back in the day the old time thieves could hot wire a bike easy....but not anymore. Bikes aren't stolen for joyrides anymore. They are stolen to be stripped and parted out.
 
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