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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Has anyone gone to a 190/55-ZR17 back tire yet? I am getting to the edge of my back tire, and it is making me nervous. I still have some more lean angle on my front tire left. I always like to have a little left in reserve, knowing that I am not at the point of crashing my brains out. Also, I was wondering if it changes the feel, somewhat. I am coming up on needing another back tire in the near future.
 

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I rear about this a while back. From what I can remember a 190 will be a bit wider but less round... so you might hit the edge sooner. Going with a 60 profile will give you more lean angle to work with. I might be a bit off, been a while since I read this. I'm grinding boots and pegs at the track and still have 1/4" to 3/8" or rubber left. Do you still have the OEM riser or aftermarket?
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
I am using FZ6 rubber top pegs with no curb feelers (less round, a little more clearance), have my feet almost all the way back because I am touching a toe from time to time. I have long forgotten tire profile sizes because my CBR could lean way further than my skill would allow.
 

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I haven't done it on the MT but...
When I was part way through changing the rear wheel on my Vfr from the OEM 5 inch Vfr rear wheel to a 6inch 1098 rear wheel, I needed new tyres. I went with a 190/50 because it would be ok on both.
Ok on the 5 inch rear, crappier on the 6inch. When it was time for another new tyre, I went with the 190/55, and it felt so much nicer.
The 55 has a sharper profile, it makes it a pointier triangle, and is designed for 6 inch rear wheels. When it gets squeezed onto a 5inch rear, it changes the profile because you've squeezed the edges a bit. I'd imagine it'd make the edges even steeper, giving more rubber on the road tipped over in a corner, but would feel more like it flops onto its side because the tip of the triangle is sharper, less rounded. It would also give you a bit more ride height.
Give it a go and tell us.
 

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It changes the feel by the profile and the ride height. I've often felt that the 120/70 on the front was too curved for the 180/55 in the rear - but I was thinking of switching the front to a 120/60 or 120/65.

R6's rim widths match the FZ-09's, and they used to come with 120/60 180/55 tires - but they switched to 120/70. So maybe it would be a mistake...

Isn't the 190/55 going to be rounder/taller than the 180/55 because the rim will still be the same width and the extra width of the tire tread has to go somewhere?
 

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It changes the feel by the profile and the ride height. I've often felt that the 120/70 on the front was too curved for the 180/55 in the rear - but I was thinking of switching the front to a 120/60 or 120/65.

R6's rim widths match the FZ-09's, and they used to come with 120/60 180/55 tires - but they switched to 120/70. So maybe it would be a mistake...

Isn't the 190/55 going to be rounder/taller than the 180/55 because the rim will still be the same width and the extra width of the tire tread has to go somewhere?
I ordered a 120/60 by mistake once for my FZ6R. I tough it wasn't going to be a big deal... handle like crap! Front end was lower, tire was extremely stiff and super slow to lean. Save some $$$, don't go that route... you won't like it.
 

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Different brands will also be different profiles even in the same size. Pirelli has a much rounder side to side profile than a Bridgestone or Michelin of the same size.

As far as changing tire sizes, I've always been of the opinion that the engineers that designed your suspension did so with the called for tire size in mind
 
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most sport bikes come with a 180/50 or 190/50 just about everyone i know switches to a 190/55 when it is time.
 
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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Different brands will also be different profiles even in the same size. Pirelli has a much rounder side to side profile than a Bridgestone or Michelin of the same size.

As far as changing tire sizes, I've always been of the opinion that the engineers that designed your suspension did so with the called for tire size in mind
If the tire was chosen by the same person that engineered the suspension, I know that they chose the wrong size because they surely chose the wrong suspension components, spring rates, and dampening, and whoever chose the Dunlop's that my bike came with, never rode the bike with cold tires.
 

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Doug, I got in a bit of a jam at Tally a couple of weekends ago and toasted my rear tire on the track bike (180/55/17) and the only thing the tire vendor had left was a 190/50/17, so it was either that, or I couldn't ride. It fit on the 600RR (clearance wise), but with it being a heavier tire, it also threw off the rebound setting for the Ohlins rear, and the bike didn't quite have the same drive out of the corners, not to mention the turn in was a bit slower. Hope this helps.
 

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If the tire was chosen by the same person that engineered the suspension, I know that they chose the wrong size because they surely chose the wrong suspension components, spring rates, and dampening, and whoever chose the Dunlop's that my bike came with, never rode the bike with cold tires.
The cheap suspension has nothing to do with bad engineering. Quality components and precision tolerance cost money so they spend the money on HP...not suspension ...because they know 50% of all buyers can't ride fer shit anyway and wouldn't know the difference. Tires that heat faster cost more money too.
 
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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Doug, I got in a bit of a jam at Tally a couple of weekends ago and toasted my rear tire on the track bike (180/55/17) and the only thing the tire vendor had left was a 190/50/17, so it was either that, or I couldn't ride. It fit on the 600RR (clearance wise), but with it being a heavier tire, it also threw off the rebound setting for the Ohlins rear, and the bike didn't quite have the same drive out of the corners, not to mention the turn in was a bit slower. Hope this helps.
THat is the kind of thing that I was looking for. Thank you.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
The cheap suspension has nothing to do with bad engineering. Quality components and precision tolerance cost money so they spend the money on HP...not suspension ...because they know 50% of all buyers can't ride fer shit anyway and wouldn't know the difference. Tires that heat faster cost more money too.
It was a joke. The shock is a fifty year old, off the shelf design. The OEM Bridgestones heat up better than the OEM Dunlops. Having worked for several luxury automobile manufactures, I learned that they buy tires in bulk and go with whichever supplier that meets the quantity, specification, and cost demand that the manufactures specify.
 

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My first 2014 Mt had dunlops, I hated them.
My insurance replacement 2014 MT has birdgestones, I Neither like or dislike them.

Only because of cold/rain performance, both fine when they've warmed up.
 
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