Two schools of thought regarding ride height, your opinions wanted.
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Two schools of thought regarding ride height, your opinions wanted.

This is a discussion on Two schools of thought regarding ride height, your opinions wanted. within the FZ-09 Performance & Suspension forums, part of the Yamaha FZ-09 Garage category; Growing up on motocross bikes, i always raised rear a little and dropped front to increase handling at the expense of stability, but who needs ...

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Thread: Two schools of thought regarding ride height, your opinions wanted.

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    Member Gregpow's Avatar
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    Two schools of thought regarding ride height, your opinions wanted.

    Growing up on motocross bikes, i always raised rear a little and dropped front to increase handling at the expense of stability, but who needs stability on a dirt bike anyways. The fz/mt is a different animal altogether. Some people on this forum suggest the opposite will happen by dropping front /raising rear even though it steepens the rake and theoretically should make it unstable puts more weight on front and actually makes it more stable. Other people say that dropping front, raising rear does in fact make bike more unstable. So maybe chime in and lets get a vote or something.

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    Senior Member Crossbar1773's Avatar
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    It all depends on your setup (front and rear suspension), your riding style - your weight and what your wanting out of it? Alot more information is needed before someone can assist in pointing you in the correct direction. Do a little research on here, alot of great information.
    Gregpow likes this.
    2015 FZ-09 - current bike
    2013 KLR 650 - Sold
    1978 KZ 400 - Purple Rain - Sold
    2010 Hyosung gt250 - Sold
    And many off road bikes and 4 wheelers in earlier years

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    Member Gregpow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossbar1773 View Post
    It all depends on your setup (front and rear suspension), your riding style - your weight and what your wanting out of it? Alot more information is needed before someone can assist in pointing you in the correct direction. Do a little research on here, alot of great information.
    I agree, suspension is stock, I just want the bike to be stable. I have done tons of research, Like i was explaining in original post people are giving different opinions. I guess I was hoping for a more black and white answer on what changes to the bike actually do.

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    Senior Member Crossbar1773's Avatar
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    To be "stable" like I think you mean, the front forks really need to be revalved at the least or replaced. I completely understand your situation after seeing some of your recent posts. The front end on this bike (Stock) can be all over the place.

    What I did, I couldn't pay for cartridges so I went the route of re-valving the front forks. I was in the area of Forks by Matt (DC Area) so I went to his place and we completely reworked my forks to suit my needs. Unfortunately he isn't around much anymore if any.

    If you go the cartridge route, in many cases they need fine tuned. So its always "adjustments in progress" when you look at suspension settings. I do have a suspension sheet somewhere that when you start messing with the suspension it makes it easier to keep track of you have done. Ill try and locate that for you.

    I see you talked with Nick at Stoltec, he gives good information and will help you in any way he can.

    Bottom line is, you do what he suggests and if you still need refinement, options are, better front forks will be needed. After that, I'd adjust the rear. If you try and replace both at once and you don't understand suspension well or have a suspension guru on hand. The suspension on this bike can drive you nuts. Just my experience.
    Gregpow likes this.
    2015 FZ-09 - current bike
    2013 KLR 650 - Sold
    1978 KZ 400 - Purple Rain - Sold
    2010 Hyosung gt250 - Sold
    And many off road bikes and 4 wheelers in earlier years

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    The laws of physics do not change....opinions do! Dropping the front and/or raising the rear will provide a quicker turn in for handling, but at the loss of stability. Doing the opposite will provide.....just the opposite!
    "If it ain't fast...........It ain't fun"!

    Vern........ Sportbike Track Time Southern Region Lead Intermediate Instructor (Retired)

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    Senior Member Crossbar1773's Avatar
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    Attached is my suspension worksheet I use to track my changes (there are always changes, lol). First do your chassis measurements. This will assist in you setting your static sag and rider height appropriately. The different suspension company recommendations in the static sag and rider height sections are just suggests. By all means they are not precise, not are they mean to be "black and white". It just gives you a good starting point. Overall its a good sheet to have. good luck.

    Suspension Worksheet.jpg
    ridetofish likes this.
    2015 FZ-09 - current bike
    2013 KLR 650 - Sold
    1978 KZ 400 - Purple Rain - Sold
    2010 Hyosung gt250 - Sold
    And many off road bikes and 4 wheelers in earlier years

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    Senior Member 1duckyboy's Avatar
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    The rear of my bike is raised about 3/8" thanks to a zx10R shock. The handling is a bit quicker, which I like, but there's no instability. One unexpected advantage of the ZX10R shock is that the front doesn't dive nearly as much as with the stock rear shock. I attribute this to the greater rebound dampening that stops the rear from raising when braking, thus limiting how much the front end dives. I reckon 75% of the front end dive is gone. I rarely ride faster than 90mph, 90% twisties, 1/4" chicken strips.
    Last edited by 1duckyboy; 06-12-2019 at 02:57 PM.
    When I was fast, motorcycles were slow.
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    Senior Member LouG's Avatar
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    Raising the rear 9mm made no discernable difference to stability on mine. I haven't tried anything more extreme because this suits me as is.
    '14 MT 09
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  10. #9
    Member Gregpow's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Crossbar1773 View Post
    Attached is my suspension worksheet I use to track my changes (there are always changes, lol). First do your chassis measurements. This will assist in you setting your static sag and rider height appropriately. The different suspension company recommendations in the static sag and rider height sections are just suggests. By all means they are not precise, not are they mean to be "black and white". It just gives you a good starting point. Overall its a good sheet to have. good luck.

    Suspension Worksheet.jpg
    Thanks crossbar for the worksheet. physics is a mystery to us mere mortals, but you guys do know this bike well.

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    Quote Originally Posted by 1duckyboy View Post
    The rear of my bike is raised about 3/8" thanks to a zx10R shock. The handling is a bit quicker, which I like, but there's no instability. One unexpected advantage of the ZX10R shock is that the front doesn't dive nearly as much as with the stock rear shock. I attribute this to the greater rebound dampening that stops the rear from raising when braking, thus limiting how much the front end dives. I reckon 75% of the front end dive is gone. I rarely ride faster than 90mph, 90% twisties, 1/4" chicken strips.
    What you are saying is certainly a possibility, although I'm not a suspension expert, but another factor involved with the rear end being raised that much is the forward shift of the weight bias on the bike, thus compressing the front forks a bit more than when the rear end height was at the "normal" height. One of my former track only bikes, a GSX-R 750 was extremely sensitive to height adjustment in order to get good stability and a good turn in for the corners. Get it wrong, and it was hard to turn in....but stable. Get it right and it was a dream come true for flickability, turn in, and never running wide out of a corner when agressively applying the throttle.
    Last edited by triplethreat; 06-12-2019 at 06:19 PM.
    Crossbar1773 likes this.
    "If it ain't fast...........It ain't fun"!

    Vern........ Sportbike Track Time Southern Region Lead Intermediate Instructor (Retired)

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